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I need a USB C (female) to USB 3.0 Micro B (male) cable. Unfortunately, I can only find a male - male cable.

Is it possible to cut the USB C plug off, and solder the wires to something like this:

enter image description here

Or is it more complicated than that? If it makes any difference, the USB 3.0 Micro B is the upstream port of a USB hub, and they USB C cable goes to the computer.

I'm a bit paranoid about killing a MBP USB port!

I know that female - female adapters do exist, but I need to cram this into a very small space, and they're all too big.

To clarify:

Currently:

USB A(male)--|
             |
             |
             |
-------------|------------------|
|             ------ usb 3.0 .  |
|                    micro B on |
|                    PCB(female)| 
|                               |
|                               |
---------------------------------

What I want:

USB C(male)--|
             |
             |
             |
             |
             |(USB C female receptacle mounted to keyboard chassis
-------------U------------------|
|             ------ usb 3.0 .  |
|                    micro B on |
|                    PCB(female)| 
|                               |
|                               |
---------------------------------

Update:

The keyboard is a Das Keyboard 4, and the PCB looks like this:

enter image description here

So that port you see on the left of the PCB is a USB 3.0 Micro B connector, and that black wire threads its way along the top of the chassis, out of a hole, and then 6 feet later, terminates in a USB A connector.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Why do you need a female Type-C if the computer also has female port? \$\endgroup\$ – Ale..chenski Apr 3 at 1:40
  • \$\begingroup\$ Because this whole thing is actually inside a keyboard. I want to replace the existing usb A to usb 3.0 Micro B cable (it's a regular cable, the pcb has a receptacle soldered on, not sure why), with a detachable USB C cable. So I need to mount a female USB C port on the chassis of the keyboard. I will then use a regular USB C cable to connect the computer to the keyboard. \$\endgroup\$ – Alex Apr 3 at 1:59
  • \$\begingroup\$ How about USB Type A to USB Type C adapter? \$\endgroup\$ – Unknown123 Apr 3 at 2:19
  • \$\begingroup\$ The USB cable currently sticking out of the keyboard is six feet long. I could stick an A-C adapter on the end, but I really want to replace it with a shorter cable, and more importantly, a cable that can be detached from the keyboard \$\endgroup\$ – Alex Apr 3 at 2:23
  • \$\begingroup\$ Please use mention feature to notify the person, else they won't notice if you're replying or not. It has been already answered here. Download USB 3.1 Specification here, open USB Type-C Specification Release 1.3.pdf and take a look at Table 3-17 USB Type-C to USB 3.1 Micro-B Cable Assembly Wiring \$\endgroup\$ – Unknown123 Apr 3 at 3:38
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After clarifications, it is finally clear what the concern is.

The device "Das Keyboard 4" appears to be a compound USB 3.0 device with embedded USB 3.0 hub (two external ports provided) and a proprietary keyboard device (with some enhancements, per manufacturer's claim). And maybe with some other extra USB devices as wheel controller. The device embeds a standard USB 3.0 cable arranged to be a "captive" (non-detachable) cable.

So the verdict is this:

  1. It is possible to use the adapter shown in the first OP picture in this device, provided that both CC lines are pulled down with 5.1k resistors. This will indicate the device side of the Type-C connection, and Type-C cables will communicate this information to host PC.

  2. However, if the cable is cut and split and soldered even with the best care, it is highly likely that the super-speed portion of the link to host won't work, because it is not possible to provide good signal integrity over this kind of adapter dongle (and over an extra connector in the link, generally). All you might get is the USB 2.0 connection, and even here you might have unstable functionality. This is the reason why manufacturer resorted to using a standard USB 3.0 u-USB to Type-A cable that is plugged directly into the internal board.

  3. Using this kind of split-soldering you will lose the flip-ability of USB 3.0 cable connection, maybe only USB 2.0 will stay. Full flip ability would require sophisticated datapath switches and a lot of CC control management, and this is the reason why no one is offering the Type-B to Type-C receptacle adapters.

I summary, I would strongly advise dropping this project. It is unlikely that you will "kill" some port, but you will kill a lot of your time for sure. Best thing you can do is to replace the manufacturer's cable with a standard u-USB to Type-C plug cable, leaving it to be non-detachable.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thank you so much for this explanation, that makes a lot more sense. As a compromise, would it be possible to use something like this: amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00WHZASVM/… in the case, with a USB A - C cable? \$\endgroup\$ – Alex Apr 4 at 11:02
  • \$\begingroup\$ Tried it... Didn't work \$\endgroup\$ – Alex Apr 4 at 16:41
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    \$\begingroup\$ @Alex, this dongle doesn't work because it is made to turn a Micro-A OTG (host-device) computer port into HOST mode. Your keyboard is not a USB host. \$\endgroup\$ – Ale..chenski Apr 4 at 17:53

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