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More specifically, I have an electric induction kettle. From what I understand, it heats the water by sending a high frequency (voltage?) signal around ~24kHz. This high frequency signal causes a rapidly changing magnetic field that induces many eddy currents into the material. The bottom of the pot becomes hot and heats the water through conduction. My question is, how is a high frequency signal created from the 120V AC current in the wall in such a small area (the induction device is roughly the size of a large hand).

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Google "Induction hob teardown" (w/o the quotes) for more information, images, videos. \$\endgroup\$ – Spehro Pefhany Apr 3 '19 at 3:32
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Short answer: semiconductor switches switching on and off extremely rapidly.

A longer answer will have to wait for either someone else, or the morning.

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