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I am working on a frequency counter project and I am in the midst of thinking about how to go about doing a triangular wave to square wave converter. I have done some research but couldn't find any circuit diagram that could help. It was mostly just triangular wave to sine wave. I would appreciate if anyone could help. Thanks.

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    \$\begingroup\$ So I'm guessing the triangle-to-sine converter circuits you found were probably all integrators? What do you think you'd get if you fed a triangle into a differentiator? \$\endgroup\$ – brhans Apr 3 at 11:51
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    \$\begingroup\$ Or a comparator? \$\endgroup\$ – Andy aka Apr 3 at 11:53
  • \$\begingroup\$ The right answer depends a bit on whether you need it to work over a wide range of amplitudes and/or frequencies, and whether the triangle wave has noise on it that has to be rejected. \$\endgroup\$ – Spehro Pefhany Apr 3 at 12:36
  • \$\begingroup\$ Differentiate it. \$\endgroup\$ – Chu Apr 3 at 18:20
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A comparator is used to produce square waves:

schematic

simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab

At high frequencies (\$ > \frac{1}{2\pi R C}\$), the R-C filter passes only the DC offset of the input signal, and the output switches at the zero-crossings relative to this level.

At low frequencies, the R-C filter simply produces a time lag and the output switches based on the slope of the input signal.

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Something like the following would work, change the ratio of r2 to r3 to change the duty cycle

schematic

simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab

The LM393 is a comparator, when the signal at the + input is greater the signal at the - input the output is pulled high via R1, when the signal at - is greater than the signal at + the output is driven low. The potential divider R2 and R3 defines the set point at which the transition from high to low happens.

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