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Often when the magnetic field of reluctance is pictured, one sees a "flow" from one stator to another across the rotor. I'm wondering if it is possible to have a reluctance motor with only one salient stator pole?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I believe you mean one salient stator pole, not one stator. Could you edit your question for clarity? \$\endgroup\$
    – TimWescott
    Apr 4, 2019 at 0:16
  • \$\begingroup\$ It looks like having pairs of electromagnets is essential to the operation of the reluctance motor -- in order to complete a "flux" circuit. I think the answer is no. intechopen.com/books/… \$\endgroup\$ Jun 2, 2019 at 1:54
  • \$\begingroup\$ If you're still interested in an answer, post a sketch of your proposed motor. If I'm interpreting your language correctly, at best you'll manage to get a motor that would keep spinning if it were given an initial, external kick. \$\endgroup\$
    – TimWescott
    Jun 2, 2019 at 21:21

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As far as we know, magnetic monopoles don't exist. As such, it's impossible for any magnet to have only one pole, so your question is one better suited for theoretical physicists than engineers.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Hi. Good point with respect to terminology. However, my question was directed at having only one stator winding (which itself would have two poles). I've modified my question accordingly. \$\endgroup\$ Apr 4, 2019 at 0:16

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