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Basically I have a device which seems to have blown a fuse. I've done some research and found that it's a "surface mount fuse" or smd fuse. My main questions are where can I find this fuse(or is any 10A 250V fuse ok) and how can I replace it. Also, are the metal ends something I can solder off solder on the new one?

I'm from Canada so I found this one by mouser. Shipping is expensive so I may look for another. (https://www.mouser.ca/ProductDetail/Bel-Fuse/SMM10)

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    \$\begingroup\$ Report back if you've got any problem, since you don't tell us your experience in soldering or electronics, I also recommend you to buy more than one fuse if you're a beginner in case something messed up. \$\endgroup\$ – Unknown123 Apr 6 at 8:11
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    \$\begingroup\$ Just a note: you have to solder it as quick as possible, and stress that fuse by heat as short as possible. If you will solder/heat it fir too long, the wire link inside fuse breaks. \$\endgroup\$ – Chupacabras Apr 6 at 12:47
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My main questions are where can I find this fuse(or is any 10A 250V fuse ok)

It's looks like UMT250 from Schurter.

It's perfectly matches the typical marking. It's Time Delay / Slow Blow type of fuse.

UMT250 from Schurter

0.72 USD at Digi-Key here, I checked that the typical ship rate to Canada is 20 USD.

0.71 USD at Mouser here, I checked that with USPS Global Priority Mail ship fees to Canada is 8 USD.

Maybe the ship cost also include other unexpected fees.

I've also found one in aliexpress here the 10A one, but they only sell in packages, thus may increase your cost even further.

and how can I replace it.

By desoldering and soldering it.

Also, are the metal ends something I can solder off solder on the new one?

A portion of exposed metal on the surface of a board to which a component can be soldered is called a pad. SMD soldering pad in this case. Yes you can solder or desolder component on the pad, as long as you solder it properly, thus the pad stays good and not getting damaged. Else it would be a daunting problem, such as here


I'm from Canada so I found this one by mouser. Shipping is expensive so I may look for another. (https://www.mouser.ca/Search/Refine?Keyword=530-SMM10)

The one you linked is SMM10 Medium / Normal Blow type fuse. The dimension is also the same so it doesn't matter whether you use it either. But the problem is that, it's 1.10 USD, it's more expensive than UMT250 because of the faster blow type.


The Size / Dimension of UMT250 is

0.398" L x 0.118" W x 0.118" H (10.10mm x 3.00mm x 3.00mm)

However, there is exist substitute for such dimension on AliExpress on it here, but it's an axial glass and not an SMD. Soldering it on the pad would be considered inappropriate or "hack", a review says it's 11mm and of course without any datasheet so I don't recommend it.

It's so difficult for me to find its SMD subtitute for such size.
I'm unable to find it, maybe the others or you can.


Conclusion, I recommend you to choose the Mouser option above if it's possible.

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In addition to the current and voltage rating, fuses has a "blow" characteristic, fast, normal, or slow (time-delay). The T on your fuse probably means Time delay, can't be sure without the datasheet.

The metal ends are integral to the component. They solder to pads on the board. This SMD part is large enough so it is manageable by a rookie. Two small soldering irons, one applied to each side, should get it off. Then solder on the new one. You will need tweezers or something to hold the part, the surface tension of solder is high and the part will want to stick to the soldering iron.

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