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I'm building a project where I use an ESP8266 module to control a LED with my smartphone. For my project I want to battery power the ESP8266 and the LED so I'm using two Lithium Ion batteries. I've designed a circuit which works but I was wondering if there are more efficient ways of powering this circuit because I'm currently using a step down module in my circuit to power the ESP8266. Everything works perfectly but I don't think I've come up with the best circuit for this project enter image description here

I know the driving circuit part for the LED is not the most efficient but I've already asked a question about that on this forum to help me fix that. The problem I have now is that I'm wondering if there's a need for a step down module to power both the LED ( LED is a 3 watt power LED) and the ESP8266. Are there any alternatives to this circuit that are more efficient? Is the step down module necessary?

P.S. I apologize for my drawing skills I'm not an electrical engineer so I'm not used to using the right symbols for everything

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    \$\begingroup\$ Possible duplicate of Using a LED with an ESP8266 module \$\endgroup\$ – Chris Stratton Apr 11 '19 at 0:16
  • \$\begingroup\$ DO NOT REPOST. edit your original question to fix the mistakes \$\endgroup\$ – Chris Stratton Apr 11 '19 at 0:16
  • \$\begingroup\$ It's not a repost it's an entirely different question but it is part of the same project I asked a question about earlier that's why it has the same keywords \$\endgroup\$ – B913 Apr 11 '19 at 0:17
  • \$\begingroup\$ It's really not different - the major power draw is still the LED. Same problem, belongs in the same question. \$\endgroup\$ – Chris Stratton Apr 11 '19 at 0:18
  • \$\begingroup\$ Alright I'll try to add in this in my other question my aplogies \$\endgroup\$ – B913 Apr 11 '19 at 0:19
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Well, although your system is so tiny, you have two elements that need a large amount of energy. ESP8266 is low power micro, but WiFi have consumption peaks around 1A. I just tell you because it is something that you should take into account because depending on what you want to achieve, it is possible that WiFi is not the technology that best matches with your purpose. You are just sendind a token to turn off or on a LED, so you do not have bandwidth constraints or things like this. But related to your question, the easiest way to know how good is your approach is checking the datasheet of your step down module. Ussualy, vendors provide a charts where you can check the efficiency of the product using the Vin and Vout as input for example.

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