-1
\$\begingroup\$

I have a 12VDC/5A from battery. I want to use that battery to supply 3.3VDC / 600 mA of microcontroller. How should I do it?

New contributor
yudha is a new contributor to this site. Take care in asking for clarification, commenting, and answering. Check out our Code of Conduct.
\$\endgroup\$

closed as too broad by Mitu Raj, winny, Finbarr, RoyC, MCG Apr 16 at 11:51

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ With a DC-DC buck converter. What have you tried so far? Have you, tried searching "12V to 3.3V schematic" on the internet? That will probably tell you as much as we can tell you, but it will be quicker and easier for you and us! \$\endgroup\$ – Puffafish Apr 16 at 7:16
  • \$\begingroup\$ thank you brother for pointout \$\endgroup\$ – yudha Apr 16 at 7:18
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ There must be a thousand ways in google results \$\endgroup\$ – Mitu Raj Apr 16 at 7:20
  • \$\begingroup\$ Connect theoutput of the battery to a regulator that outputs at 3.3V and search in its datasheet if it can deliver the current you want . Most of the regulators can deliver up to 1 Amp without problem . \$\endgroup\$ – Suparman Sy Apr 16 at 7:24
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Google 'Voltage regulator'. You'll get thousands of circuits. You can then experiment with linear and switching regulators and get some practical experience \$\endgroup\$ – MCG Apr 16 at 8:39
0
\$\begingroup\$

Beware of switching-regulator noise. There will be 0.1 volt of switching ripple (such as 2MHz), determined by the load current and the expense of capacitors (larger is better, but more expensive) on output of the SMPS.

There will also be ringing in the 10MHz region, if the supply has to operate in the Discontinous mode.

And there will be (EVIL) ringing at 100MHz, because of parasitic Ls and Cs. If you need CLEAN 3.3 volts, then cascade a Switcher with a Linear regulator; this is shown below.

schematic

simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab

\$\endgroup\$
1
\$\begingroup\$

Use a buck converter with upto 1A rating. It's good to have some margin. There are 2 types to consider. Non synchronous vs synchronous. The synchronous buck converter is more efficient but also slightly more complex. I think non synchronous should be good enough in your case, but you will decide. Check TI, ST microelectronics, etc. They offer many buck regulator chips. If you want help with schematics, feel free to contact me. I'd be glad to help.

New contributor
Elektrofreak is a new contributor to this site. Take care in asking for clarification, commenting, and answering. Check out our Code of Conduct.
\$\endgroup\$
1
\$\begingroup\$

Use any buck switching regulator. Do not use a linear voltage regulator as it is not very efficient for converting a 12v input to a 3.3v input.

Switching regulators are available of TI,ST etc. Another alternative is to buy a power module.(From Traco, Minmax)

New contributor
Arun Kumar is a new contributor to this site. Take care in asking for clarification, commenting, and answering. Check out our Code of Conduct.
\$\endgroup\$

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.