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I consider myself as a beginner, so please don't be that hard to me.

Can I theoreticaly destroy a unfused load if I disconnect all loads but one in the same circuit? In my understanding the current which would normally spread to all these loads would then only flow through the remaining loads which is still connected and could destroy it because it was not build for such high current?

For example: I bought a scooter. If you disconnect the rear blinkers, then the front blinkers are way faster, so I think it is because more current is flowing through it.

So if I disconnect the ECU (36) in the following circuit then I guess the current is very high on the remaining components.

I thought the fuses would blow in this case, but I had the case were the plastic of the fuses was just melting but the fuses stayed alive after I had a shortcircuit, almost all loads were disconnected at that time.

This is the circuit:

Aprilia SR50

LEGEND FOR SWITCH PANEL - SR 50 PUREJET
1) multiple plug
2) dipped beam / high beam relay
3) Oil level switch
4) Fuel level sensor
5) Cockpit (matrix)
6) Immobilizer antenna
7) Ignition key switch
8) Horn
9) Left light switch
10) Rear brake light switch (on left
Switch)
11) Right light switch
12) Front brake light switch (on
right switch)
13) Rear turn signal, left
14) Tail light
15) Double light bulb for stand
/ Brake light
16) Rear turn signal, right
17) License plate lighting (only at
Versions USA / CH)
18) Pick up
19) generator
20) Voltage regulator
21) injection relay
22) Starting relay (fault protection)
23) starter motor
24) Battery
25) fuses
26) Fuel pump
27) Air nozzle
28) Fuel Injector
29) Pressure sensor (or in the control unit
integrated)
30) Cylinder head temperature switch
31) HS coil
32) spark plug
33) Gas control sensor
34) Serial connection (Diag.) 35) Oil pump
36) ECU control unit
37) Speed ​​sensor
38) Front turn signal, right
39) Front parking lights (only at
Versions USA / CH)
40) low beam
41) high beam
42) Front turn signal, left
43) headlights
44) diode
45) -
46) -
47) -
48) -
49) -
CABLE COLORS
Ar Orange
Az light blue
B blue
Bi white
G yellow
Gr Gray
M brown
N black
R red
V green
Vi Viola
Ro Rosa
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  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Hi, you didn't mention in this question, an important fact mentioned in your last question from yesterday - this scooter of yours is already known to have at least one fault. You are now trying to learn electrical theory about current etc. using faulty equipment. That's going to be very difficult for you, as it won't seem to make much sense - that's because of the fault(s) causing strange behaviour. Personally I suspect the scooter has more faults than described in your previous question. \$\endgroup\$ – SamGibson Apr 21 at 10:06
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In my understanding the current which would normally spread to all these consumers would then only flow through the remaining consumer ...

No. The battery voltage on your scooter will remain almost constant. Each circuit (consumer) will draw only the current it needs.

If you disconnect the rear blinkers, then the front blinkers are way faster, so I think it is because more current is flowing through it.

No, the blinker relay is designed that way so that you get a visual indication that one of the bulbs has failed. It is blinking faster because less current is flowing.

So if I disconnect the ECU (36) in the following circuit then I guess the current is very high on the remaining components.

No. The battery voltage will remain the same.

I thought the fuses would blow in this case, but I had the case were the plastic of the fuses was just melting but the fuses stayed alive after I had a shortcut, almost all consumers were disconnected at that time.

"Short circuit" is the correct term but it is not clear what situation you are describing here. If you have a short circuit before the fuses will not blow and maybe the fusebox will get hot.


Battery voltage will normally drop a little when you increase the load. On a car, for example, with the engine idling you might see the lights dim a little when the wipers and heater fan are turned on.

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Can I theoreticaly destroy a unfused load if I disconnect all loads but one in the same circuit?

Yes absolutely, is the supply is a current source removing neaded loads can damage other loads. your has a battery, so the supply is a voltage source. so in your case no.

In my understanding the current which would normally spread to all these loads would then only flow through the remaining loads which is still connected and could destroy it because it was not build for such high current?

some scooters are like that, but not yours.

For example: I bought a scooter. If you disconnect the rear blinkers, then the front blinkers are way faster, so I think it is because more current is flowing through it.

no that is because the blinker controller is sensitive to the load, the fast blinking it to warn the driver to replace the bulb.

I thought the fuses would blow in this case, but I had the case were the plastic of the fuses was just melting but the fuses stayed alive after I had a shortcircuit, almost all loads were disconnected at that time.

that can happen if the over-load is not enough to blow the fuse, or if the wrong fuse is used.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ The fuses were correct. \$\endgroup\$ – Black Apr 22 at 20:43

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