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I am new to FPGA use. While I can find considerable information on programming them, I would like to know how FPGA manufacturers decided what elements to include? I.e., how is the internal design of the FPGA determined?

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closed as too broad by The Photon, Elliot Alderson, Brian Carlton, RoyC, Finbarr Apr 26 at 9:36

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    \$\begingroup\$ Theory, lots and lots of experience, input from customers, buying and usage patterns, etc. \$\endgroup\$ – jonk Apr 23 at 21:31
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    \$\begingroup\$ One way you could do it is synthesize the one or more designs onto FPGA's and see how much resources are needed, and change the unit blocks global nets ect and see how much resources they use up. \$\endgroup\$ – Voltage Spike Apr 23 at 21:34
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I would like to know how FPGA manufacturers decided what elements to include? I.e., how is the internal design of the FPGA determined?

A major part of this is telemetry. Xilinx collects data from their users through a feature called WebTalk, for instance -- this data includes information on the utilization of fabric and routing resources, and is likely used as an indicator of what blend of resources should be included in future parts. Intel (previously Altera) has a similar feature under the name TalkBack, and other manufacturers probably have similar functionality as well.

Beyond that, FPGA makers will often work closely with large customers in developing designs, and will take feedback from those customers about unexpected limitations of their parts.

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