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I have a 12V 200AH lead acid battery and I want my load be a power resistor and a bulb. Does the batter draw current based on the load resistance? so meaning the current that will be drawn in this case is 12/(load resistance) ? does a typical bulb require a specific voltage and current?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Which bulb did you have in mind? \$\endgroup\$ – Tony Stewart Sunnyskyguy EE75 Apr 24 at 2:36
  • \$\begingroup\$ @SunnyskyguyEE75, hi Sunnysky, welcome again :). I am trying an idea of testing some relays with this load. I am wondering if there is a bulb that can operate from 6-12V and still be operating properly. I will also add a power resistor to limit the current going to the blub. \$\endgroup\$ – abu khlad Apr 24 at 8:18
  • \$\begingroup\$ you can dim LEDstrips from 14.2V down to 8V using a PWM module which you can buy for/with 5m reels \$\endgroup\$ – Tony Stewart Sunnyskyguy EE75 Apr 24 at 9:40
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The battery (or any constant voltage power supply) will deliver a current that depends on the supply voltage and load resistance, as determined by Ohm's Law.

Incandescent light bulbs are designed to operate on a specific voltage, depending on their intended operation. A bulb intended for 12 volt operation (for use in a car) will be instantly destroyed if you try to operate it from 120 volts. a bulb designed for 120 volts (for use at home) will not produce any useful light when operated from 12 volts (it might get slightly warm).

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