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I'm making a detailed electrical diagram which needs to include splices. From researching on Google I couldn't find the conventional symbol for a butt splice, or even a splice, in an electrical diagram. Does anyone know what this looks like?

Thanks

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    \$\begingroup\$ I don't think there is a symbol, as a splice is supposed to be electrically indistinguishable from just an unspliced wire. \$\endgroup\$ – Hearth Apr 24 at 20:24
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    \$\begingroup\$ A splice is typically designated by a dot on the connection line. I don't know if this is just a habit one of my teachers had or a best practice though. \$\endgroup\$ – K H Apr 26 at 1:51
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I don't often draw wiring diagrams (that's for the MechE's to figure out), but when I do, I'll usually draw boxes around every type of union to explain EXACTLY what I want. You only need to do it once per junction type, but if you have different types, make sure they look different (color, shape, and line type, if you can).

This isn't mine, but something like this:

diagram of butt splice

(Image source: Equipment Quality Standards - Electrical, from California Dept. of Transportation (Caltrans))

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  • \$\begingroup\$ This looks fine. However, in industrial drawings the dotted box most often means "located in a separate enclosure" \$\endgroup\$ – Marla Apr 24 at 23:11
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On industrial wiring diagrams terminals are often marked like a Ø (circle with a slash) or circle with a diagonal diameter line - perhaps indicating a slotted screw head as is found in many terminals. I suggest some variation of this.

Note that some schematics don't perform wiring diagram functions and electrically your splice is still the same network node so would not have to be documented. A wiring diagram, on the other hand, will usually show the wires rather than the network or schema. You may be drawing a hybrid schematic / wiring diagram. Suit yourself.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I didn't know the difference between schematic and wiring diagram, that's pretty useful, thanks. \$\endgroup\$ – user211492 Apr 25 at 13:11

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