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I'm new here, so sorry for any inconvenience/misunderstanding. I want to have 4 motors that will all turn 90 degrees forward then stop on a button. Then when the same or different button is pressed, the motor will reverse 90 degrees back to the original position. Any help or advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

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closed as too broad by Elliot Alderson, brhans, Wesley Lee, RoyC, Finbarr May 2 at 15:51

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    \$\begingroup\$ You need a servo motor to do this with a pot feedback for position. \$\endgroup\$ – Sunnyskyguy EE75 May 1 at 21:18
  • \$\begingroup\$ Please edit your question to explain (1) the application, (2) what type of motors, AC or DC voltage and current or power, (3) what the buttons are - finger buttons or limit switches. \$\endgroup\$ – Transistor May 1 at 21:18
  • \$\begingroup\$ en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Servo_(radio_control) \$\endgroup\$ – Sunnyskyguy EE75 May 1 at 21:20
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    \$\begingroup\$ How fast, how strong? This would be easy-peasy if the mechanical constraints could be satisfied with RC servos -- you'd just need to give them power and the proper PWM signal. \$\endgroup\$ – TimWescott May 1 at 21:30
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    \$\begingroup\$ If an RC servo would work you could control it with an Arduino or a couple of IC chips (say a 555 and a 74HC00 plus a few other parts). \$\endgroup\$ – Spehro Pefhany May 1 at 21:54
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For only 90 degrees of rotation, I would consider a push-pull solenoid operating a bell crank mechanism.

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Could be done with end stops and micro-switches cutting power when it reaches the 90 degrees. As for turning back either have a second button powering the motor in reverse, again, switched off by a micro-switch.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Also quite commonly done with a rotary wafer cam type mechanism having quarter circle tracks on it which complete the circuit until they rotate too far. \$\endgroup\$ – Chris Stratton May 2 at 0:25

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