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I have developed a circuit that uses a capacitor's voltage to reverse bias a thyristor.

The voltage to reverse bias it is only about 10% of its off-state blocking voltage. I am confused how I would calculate the losses of the thyristor in simulation.

Would I find the turn-on/off energies at the specified di/dt for the turn off, and then scale that by the blocking voltage (which, at the moment of switching, is only 10% its maximum?)

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The instantaneous power dissipated in the thyristor is the main terminal voltage multiplied by the main terminal current. Most circuit simulators (e.g., SPICE-based) will be happy to calculate this for you, and even integrate it over the cycle period to get the total energy.

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Switching any solid state switch (thyristor, MOSFET, SCR) at zero volts or zero current will produce less switching losses since less energy is dissipated in the linear region during the transition. This is the basis of quasi-resonant switching circuits.

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