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I have Electronic board with power supply , control board etc. I wanted to conduct noise test . Is there any standard procedure available. I wanted to check if i induce the noise into power line or controller line microcontroller will operate normally or Reset every time. The device work fine in normal condition. when it goto Control panel it may affected with other device

We have EMI/EMC test facility to take of it. But is there is simple way to conduct noise test where we could induce particular frequency of noise and check its functionality.

Test should meet IEC standard.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Bring a smart phone near your board. Or go to kitchen, grab an old electric mixer with its spark-generating motor, and bring the motor near your board. \$\endgroup\$ – analogsystemsrf May 7 at 13:41
  • \$\begingroup\$ Are you talking about conducted or radiated immunity? \$\endgroup\$ – Voltage Spike May 16 at 17:20
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You could use a scope or spectrum, based on your signal of interest (low frequency - scope, high - spectrum). Connect the output of your board to your measuring device, measure the measuring device noise before, turn on your device and watch if the measuring equipment internal noise has been increased.

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If your talking about radiated immunity:

If you want to preform the IEC test, then it would be best to get the same equipment as the place that your testing and shielded room. The reason for this is you can't radiate on the same frequencies as someone else's radio band.

However, performing precompliance radiated immunity testing in a small shielded room is not a viable option, for the same reasons that it was not viable for performing radiated emission tests, that is, the problem of reflections causing large uncontrollable peaks and nulls in the radiated field pattern. Therefore, some other method must be found to do precompliance-radiated immunity testing. Two possibilities exist. One would be to use a low-power broadband source of radiation and to place it close to the EUT. The second would be to use a narrowband radio transmitter that is presently authorized by the FCC for use by the public, license free, such as those for the Family Radio Service or Citizen Band (CB) radios. This approach, however, only allows testing at certain specific spot frequencies

Source: (pg 718) Electromagnetic Compatibility Engineering. Author(s):. Henry W. Ott.

Conducted immunity into a power supply:

There isn't really a good way to do this as far as I'm aware of.

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