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A friend of mine asked me if I could identify a component that keeps causing the flow of current to stop in a 12 V 1 motor system he has increased to 2 motors (perhaps due to overload or heat). He says that when he by-passes this particular component the circuit no longer shuts down, but the wiring starts to get very hot/melt.

The component looks quit old and has some numbers on it but I could not find out anything about it. I think he uprated the battery to cope with the 2 motors but the extra current is causing this component the shut down the current flow temporarily. I have added a picture. Any suggestions?

enter image description here

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  • \$\begingroup\$ please share more images of the component and the components position in pcb also \$\endgroup\$ May 10 '19 at 13:43
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    \$\begingroup\$ It maybe a resettable fuse \$\endgroup\$ May 10 '19 at 13:45
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    \$\begingroup\$ It's almost certainly a thermal overload switch, and its clearly doing the job it's intended to do if it shuts down the circuit before "the wiring starts to get very hot/melt". \$\endgroup\$
    – brhans
    May 10 '19 at 14:25
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    \$\begingroup\$ I agree, looks like a bi-metal thermal switch. \$\endgroup\$
    – JRaef
    May 10 '19 at 20:52
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It makes no difference what it is. It is the component that is protecting the motor from the real problem. The most probable problem is that the motor does not have sufficient power or torque to do the job. There is also the possibility of improper motor use.

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Looks like some sort of a fuse....probably a Resettable PTC Fuse.

  • A Resettable PTC Fuse exhibits the same characteristics as you mentioned. (i.e. getting hot and cutting the power to the motor).

  • When current above the threshold current of the fuse flows, the fuse gets hot and stops conducting. The conduction of electricity resumes when high current or temperature gets removed.

  • I would suggest that instead of by-passing the fuse, you should get a resettable fuse with more current allowance. Also, do change the wiring to a lower gauge wire to withstand the current without melting up.

enter image description here

Source of info.

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