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I am designing a board that uses a 969973-3 wire-to-board receptacle. In its drawing there are specified six 1.2 mm (mounting?) holes.

Does anybody know what are they used for?

I've seen pictures and 3D models for this connector and have not observed any body plastic parts that may be present on its bottom side, that may fit in those holes.

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It looks to me like it's possible to poke a wire or mating connector all the way through the board, or insert a wire or mating connector from the back of the board, if those holes are present. This allows easy board stacking without needing the full height of the connector between the boards.

In fact, this seems to be corroborated by these sections of the linked drawing:

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

Notice that note 5, "Only with the bottom entry" is specifically marked on the holes you're asking about, and that note 3 states that top and bottom entry are both options for this device.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Please confirm if I understood correctly: the connector has holes in its body that allows one to insert a wire all the way through the board and connector? \$\endgroup\$ – Cristian M May 25 at 14:47
  • \$\begingroup\$ Right, if I'm reading the drawing correctly the pin holes in the connector are open on both sides. If you have an additional opening on the board then you can put a wire all the way through, or insert a wire from the back. \$\endgroup\$ – Hearth May 25 at 14:49
  • \$\begingroup\$ Interesting. I've never used this feature. Good to know. Thank you! \$\endgroup\$ – Cristian M May 25 at 14:50
  • \$\begingroup\$ @CristianM I found information in the drawing that confirms this, too; check the edited answer. \$\endgroup\$ – Hearth May 25 at 14:53
  • \$\begingroup\$ Thank you again. I've seen that information, but I did not understood it. \$\endgroup\$ – Cristian M May 25 at 14:54

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