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There is this socket for a light bulb, and it says LED only.

Why is it like that?

Is it just for power limitation (not to exceed power,) because LEDs take less power, or is there another reason?

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    \$\begingroup\$ Link to datasheet, please. \$\endgroup\$ – Transistor Jun 2 at 18:12
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    \$\begingroup\$ Almost certainly because that light fixture has not been designed to be able to handle the amount of heat a non-LED (halogen) GU10 bulb would produce. \$\endgroup\$ – brhans Jun 2 at 18:38
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Yes it is a power limitation. Many light fixtures with just regular lamp sockets may have rating like 10W and it is quite clear that heat from regular incandescent bulbs would melt the material. It also might allow for cables with smaller wire diameter.

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Most likely a power/current limit. Classical light bulbs consume much more power, therefore need more current. They probably used low gauge wire not capable of handling that much current. Unless there is some drive circuitry hidden in there, but I dont think so.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Welcome to EE.SE. "Classical light bulbs consume much less power, therefore need less current." If by "classical" you mean incandescent then the answer is incorrect. LED lamps are much more efficient than incandescent. If that's not what you mean then please edit the answer using the edit link below it. \$\endgroup\$ – Transistor Jun 2 at 21:18
  • \$\begingroup\$ Yes sorry, brainfart. I meant more... \$\endgroup\$ – Lucas Imark Jun 2 at 21:25

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