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In a fan motor I have, the written specifications are as follow :

"dual power: 110/230v 50/60Hz 22/20w".

I would like to power the motor directly, without electronic parts between any 220V wall power socket and the motor ( only a standard power plug unit). To select the appropriate 220v power plug I need to know the amperage.

Using the formula A=w(20)/V(230), I get A=0.0869

  1. Are my calculations correct ?
  2. If they are, then I am lost. What kind of power plug could I use to get such a low amperage?
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The plug only needs to support an amperage equal to or greater than your device requires. A plug that supports excessive amperage will not cause any issues.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Is is true for any other case for the selection of a power plug ? \$\endgroup\$ – Sam Jun 6 '19 at 19:51
  • \$\begingroup\$ I would add that even though @Sam will be powering the fan at 220 V, he should consider the worst case that someone may switch the fan to 110 V and expect the plug to be adequate (should make no difference in this case since it'll still be a small 0.2 A current draw). \$\endgroup\$ – RaphaelP Jun 6 '19 at 21:37
  • \$\begingroup\$ And I partially disagree with you last sentence since using a plug that supports excessive amperage could make @Sam end up with a heavy duty high power plug that expects thick wires. So, the possibly thin fan wires could make for a bad connection with the plug's terminals and get little support from the plug's casing. \$\endgroup\$ – RaphaelP Jun 6 '19 at 21:41
  • \$\begingroup\$ So to clarify, more amperage isn't a problem but a too large up-difference would require new considerations. Thank you guys! \$\endgroup\$ – Sam Jun 7 '19 at 17:40
  • \$\begingroup\$ The plug may be bigger than necessary, and that could be inconvenient but there won't be any safety issues. \$\endgroup\$ – Drew Jun 9 '19 at 2:15

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