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I’m designing a simple dc motor speed controller that only needs to be driven in one direction and I’m wondering if an H-bridge configuration would have any advantages over a single or dual MOSFET control scheme besides being bidirectional. The motor in my project only needs to be driven in one direction but should be capable of dissipating power when spun in the other direction by the user - for example an electronic skateboard only needs to be driven in one direction but should also be able to spin (and dissipate power) in the other direction.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Comments are not for extended discussion; this conversation has been moved to chat. Any conclusions reached should be edited back into the question and/or any answer(s). \$\endgroup\$ – Dave Tweed Jun 20 '19 at 20:00
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The H Bridge is more expensive and complicated and easier to Blow up ,But it gives Regen Braking and Foward /Reverse .The H Bridge offers 4 Quadrent operation where the single switch offers single quadrent operation.Maybe a half bridge is suitable for your application.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Why do you say an H-bridge is easier to blow up - shoot-through? \$\endgroup\$ – pericynthion Jun 20 '19 at 5:31
  • \$\begingroup\$ Shoot through is an issue .Standard mosfets have slow diodes which can cause current spikes \$\endgroup\$ – Autistic Jun 21 '19 at 10:57

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