0
\$\begingroup\$

In layman terms, why doppler spectral power density has U shape?

Does this mean that frequency components with maximum doppler shift have maximum power?

I am confused with the interpretation of the doppler spectral power density U-shaped graph, for example the one at https://blog.taitradio.com/2015/09/23/9-channel-concepts-every-system-designer-needs-to-understand/.

Additionally, I found this source: https://www.sharetechnote.com/html/Handbook_LTE_Fading.html. Does this mean that the U-shaped graph actually depicts probability density of frequency shifts and has nothing to do with the power/amplitude?

\$\endgroup\$
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Please add some context to your question so we can answer it. What is the source of the signal being analyzed? \$\endgroup\$ – Barry Jun 24 '19 at 11:47
  • \$\begingroup\$ "In layman's terms": um, no, a layman would need a couple of hours of explanation what a Doppler spectrum is. You'll need to explain what you don't understand yourself. As is, this question prompts us to write a complete introdcution to signals and systems, to channels and to spectral estimation. That's far too broad for a single answer. Please narrow down your question. \$\endgroup\$ – Marcus Müller Jun 24 '19 at 11:54
  • \$\begingroup\$ I am confused with the interpretation of the doppler spectral power density U-shaped graph, for example the one at blog.taitradio.com/2015/09/23/…. \$\endgroup\$ – Quirik Jun 24 '19 at 12:00
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Put that taitradio context in your question. \$\endgroup\$ – Neil_UK Jun 24 '19 at 12:47
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Neil_UK OK, I did. \$\endgroup\$ – Quirik Jun 24 '19 at 14:38

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.