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I brought this 50A Solar Controller now I want to connect an inverter to it and they said to connect the inverter directly to the battery. I also brought a 100W Solar Panel and MC4 Wires, etc

What is these "60A/50A/40A/30A/20A/10A "? I choose the 50A one and wanted to know the Amps are used for DC Load or what's the use of selecting "60A/50A/40A/30A/20A/10A" if it is to be connected to the battery eventually?

The reason for not wanting to connect it to the battery is: The Protections (Load, Over Charging, Deep Charging, etc) go away if I connect the inverter to the battery directly.

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closed as off-topic by duskwuff, Transistor, RoyC, Sparky256, Chris Stratton Jul 24 at 17:26

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions on the use of electronic devices are off-topic as this site is intended specifically for questions on electronics design." – duskwuff, Transistor, RoyC, Sparky256, Chris Stratton
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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The solar controller you bought goes between the solar panels and the battery bank. It is designed to control the charging of the battery bank only, not to control the inverter / battery connection.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Ahhh gotcha! So the DC Out Load is useless? (I'm asking cause I have no idea what 50A are for) \$\endgroup\$ – Graham Miranda Jul 12 at 18:12
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There's a diagram on the page you link showing that the inverter should be connected to the battery direct. These controllers have a DC out that is intended to allow it to disconnect the loads at a particular terminal voltage, so that the battery doesn't over-discharge, but in this case the capacity of that output is limited (it's probably done with a MOSFET), and the inverter can potentially take more than that - unless it's a only a small one.

Given that limitation, you need to check that the inverter has its own undervoltage trip if it's going to be left unattended, or you risk pulling the battery state of charge low enough that it'd be permanently damaged.

enter image description here

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  • \$\begingroup\$ "you risk pulling the battery state of charge low enough that it'd be permanently damaged." Yup thats what I'm worried about! \$\endgroup\$ – Graham Miranda Jul 12 at 23:49
  • \$\begingroup\$ What load is the inverter supplying, and what is its rating? The webpage indicates 360W max for the DC out, so if it's less than that you may get away with connecting to the DC out, but inverters often have some substantial smooting capacitors in them, which take a fair current when connected, so that needs to be allowed for. \$\endgroup\$ – Phil G Jul 15 at 13:42
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The "60A/50A/40A/30A/20A/10A" is the maximum amperage the controller can handle. You would want to size the controller based on the total amperage output of your solar panels. You have a 100 watt solar panel and if you hook it up to a 12 volt battery: 100watts / 12 volts = 8.33 amps, you would need a 10A solar controller. If you had a 1200 watt solar array and were going to use a 24 volt battery: 1200W / 24V = 50A, you would need a 50A controller. Hope this helps..... Good luck

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If you want whatever battery protection the charge controller provides, feel free to attach it to the DC Load terminals of the charge controller. That is what it is for. The inverter is a DC load.

However make sure the charge controller can handle the DC ampacity the inverter can draw.

If the inverter instructions are saying to hook it up to the battery, those may be generic instructions because they don't know your system.

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This low cost charger gives you good;

  • short-circuit protection,open-circuit protection,reverse protection,over-load protection., Dual mosfet Reverse current protection ,low heat production. As long as you follow instructions on connect/disconnect sequence.

it does not give you

  • MPPT control of PV ( more cost option)
  • Low V protection ( this is controlled by inverter UVLO function.)
  • matched impedance on output load ( this you choose by design and selection of load to battery ESR / inverter voltage ratio and power ratios)
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  • \$\begingroup\$ Looks like @Jack glass half-empty was here \$\endgroup\$ – Sunnyskyguy EE75 Jul 15 at 3:43

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