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Can anyone else identify this element? What is it? Seems to have 150A stamped on the left side - is it a fuse?

enter image description here

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    \$\begingroup\$ I doubt it's a fuse, as the slag would not be contained, there's no fuse body. It's much more likely a current shunt. \$\endgroup\$ – John D Jul 31 '19 at 15:08
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    \$\begingroup\$ @JohnD First it’s a current shunt, then a fuseas the current increases. \$\endgroup\$ – winny Jul 31 '19 at 15:18
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    \$\begingroup\$ @winny LOL, yes, you're obviously right. \$\endgroup\$ – John D Jul 31 '19 at 15:19
  • \$\begingroup\$ It came out of a forklift - does it make sense? \$\endgroup\$ – KingsInnerSoul Jul 31 '19 at 16:38
  • \$\begingroup\$ Why wasn't that mentioned in the question? \$\endgroup\$ – Transistor Jul 31 '19 at 17:39
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Looks like a crude form of "ANL" style automotive fuse as used in (insane) audio systems and inverters.

Similar to this (from this website):

enter image description here

It would be used in an individual fuse holder with a (typically transparent) cover on it. As it's intended only for low voltage applications, it probably does not need to meet much in the way of safety standards to be sold.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Definitely could be a crude fuse. I originally thought shunt, but hard to see what the dimensions are from the photo. If it's similar to your example it's too small to be a 150A shunt for sure. \$\endgroup\$ – John D Jul 31 '19 at 15:31
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    \$\begingroup\$ A 150A shunt should have 4 connections. \$\endgroup\$ – Spehro Pefhany Jul 31 '19 at 15:33
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    \$\begingroup\$ Also true, but I have seen crude OCP type shunts that don't have the Kelvin connections. Whatever it is it looks very low cost, so definitely no frills :) \$\endgroup\$ – John D Jul 31 '19 at 15:42
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    \$\begingroup\$ My vote is also on fuse. Having designed a battery charger with a 70 A maxi fuse on the output, I see how a simplification like this could spring up on the market, at least in the EU and used on the DC side where you often only need to prove your weak link fuses each time but not actually type test it, would save a lot of money. \$\endgroup\$ – winny Jul 31 '19 at 16:01
  • \$\begingroup\$ It came out of a forklift - does it make sense? \$\endgroup\$ – KingsInnerSoul Jul 31 '19 at 16:38

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