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I am having trouble identifying the socket type of the power connection on an old voltmeter I purchased. It did not come with a cable, so I am trying to find a new one which will fit in the socket. It has two pins near the bottom of a circular hole, and a plastic ridge at the very bottom for alignment.

The socket in question

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    \$\begingroup\$ According to here it's a Gniazdo MERA-ZEM 250V 6A Meratronik. \$\endgroup\$
    – Transistor
    Commented Jul 31, 2019 at 20:52
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    \$\begingroup\$ Soviet-era Eastern Europe? \$\endgroup\$ Commented Jul 31, 2019 at 20:54
  • \$\begingroup\$ If a plug cannot be obtained, it should be possible (with adequate dimensions) to design a 3D model of the plug, 3D print it, and slip in some terminals. Will require someone skilled in 3D printers and electronics. \$\endgroup\$
    – rdtsc
    Commented Jul 31, 2019 at 21:06
  • \$\begingroup\$ Chances are a $10 voltmeter from Amazon is going to perform as well as this thing you got yourself here. Best of luck, the 3D printing option might be the easiest. \$\endgroup\$
    – MadHatter
    Commented Aug 1, 2019 at 3:00

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It doesn't look radically different from a Bulgin 5A connector from the UK, 1950s/1960s era, e.g. Nos 1,2 on this page, though without the ground pin. Often used on valve amplifiers, Leak and others.

Of course, without detailed dimensions, one can't be sure, but might be worth a closer look.

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    \$\begingroup\$ the missing ground pin can perhaps be explained by the "double insulation" symbol above the socket. \$\endgroup\$ Commented Aug 1, 2019 at 5:34

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