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I'm currently working on a prototype patch antenna for UHF. Since I'm out of copper at the moment, I used empty PCB's as base material (don't mind the PCB in between, it's only a spacer):

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So now my question: Does the plastic part of my director isolate the magnetic / electric field to the reflector, or is it harmless?

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    \$\begingroup\$ If you are building a patch antenna, you can't just ignore the PCB in the middle. The dielectric constant of the material between the plates is critical to the performance of the antenna. Casually building patch antennas without understanding EM theory is just not practical. \$\endgroup\$ – Dean Franks Aug 8 '19 at 21:06
  • \$\begingroup\$ Yeah, seems pretty logical that it has an effect; but is it "don't work" critical (get some copper, use a two-sided pcb), or just "a bit" critical (would work, but brings a bad performance)? \$\endgroup\$ – Essigwurst Aug 9 '19 at 4:25
  • \$\begingroup\$ You would have to define "work". The dielectric forms a critical, active part of the antenna, along with the conductive areas. The feed arrangement is also critical. Without taking all of these things into account, a random coat hanger is likely to perform better. Patch antennas are probably the most difficult type of antenna to create without formal design methods and appropriate test equipment (often both are required). \$\endgroup\$ – Dean Franks Aug 9 '19 at 19:30
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Since patch antennas are commonly made on pcb's, it would work. But as stated the dielectric properties of the material will of course influence the result.

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