4
\$\begingroup\$

the thing

I've taken apart a peltier cooling box to salvage the peltier element and also found this thing. The block seems to be plain aluminum, I'm interested in the cylindrical thing at the bottom.

The peltier element was placed on top of the block, the inside of the fridge was below. The heat shrink on the left of the block is just isolation, there is no wire going in or out.

\$\endgroup\$
4
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Nowhere near confident enough to say for sure, but I'd guess some kind of thermal sensor or thermal fuse. \$\endgroup\$
    – Hearth
    Commented Aug 10, 2019 at 15:49
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ That is a thermal cut-off switch. \$\endgroup\$
    – Jeroen3
    Commented Aug 10, 2019 at 15:49
  • \$\begingroup\$ Appears to be a thermal cutout as others have noted. It "must" have two contacts in some manner. It could have the body connected to one so that there is continuity between the block and the braid sleeved wire. \$\endgroup\$
    – Russell McMahon
    Commented Aug 10, 2019 at 16:02
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ There are two wires coming out of it, the one to the left and the one to the right are separated. \$\endgroup\$
    – Jasper
    Commented Aug 10, 2019 at 16:21

2 Answers 2

11
\$\begingroup\$

It's a thermostat, originally known by the Klixon (now Sensata) name. They are based on a bimetallic disk, which is why they are cylindrical.

Some types have a reset switch (a button in the center of the hidden side in your photo) and do not automatically reset, but most are simple thermostats with a fairly wide (maybe 5 to 15 degrees C) hysteresis. Below is a photo of a resettable type with mounting ears from this website:

enter image description here

They are rather common in consumer appliances- cheap, simple and rugged.

\$\endgroup\$
2
\$\begingroup\$

I think Bimetallic Thermostat is the proper term. These use two metals with different expansion, so the bands made from these bend at certain temperatures. I guess this part is cylindrical because the band is rolled up inside. But it's hard to tell from this picture.

\$\endgroup\$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.