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all. Anyone know what value this capacitor should be? It says 104... but that does not help. enter image description here

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  • \$\begingroup\$ The value "104" means \$10 \times 10^4 = 100000\$ This is in pF so 100nF. \$\endgroup\$ – Warren Hill Aug 16 '19 at 7:47
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104 means 10 with 4 zeros. Measured in picofarads. So 100000pF or 100nF or 0.1uF

103 would be 10 with 3 zeros - 10000pF or 10nF or 0.01uF

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Ah makes sense. Thanks HandyHowie \$\endgroup\$ – circuit_noob533 Aug 12 '19 at 16:51
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That "104" notation is similar to the resistor colour code - it gives the first two digits of the value, then the number of zeros to give the value in picofarads.

If you want to buy a 0.1 uF capacitor, the manufacturer's part number will probably have "104" in it somewhere, but I consider it very bad practice to use that code on schematics.

(If they use "104" for the capacitor, why don't they use "102" for the 1K resistor, to be consistent?)

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thank you and Good point. The schematics I am referencing are not the best. Lots of inconsistencies and missing passive components. \$\endgroup\$ – circuit_noob533 Aug 12 '19 at 17:11
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That is the value: 100000 pF or 100 nF.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Can you please explain how you are able to tell? \$\endgroup\$ – circuit_noob533 Aug 12 '19 at 16:47
  • \$\begingroup\$ Many years of experience. It can't really be anything else. \$\endgroup\$ – Leon Heller Aug 12 '19 at 16:52

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