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I have lead Acid Battery which I found in my old stuff I took it out and check the readings with my multimeter the battery is completely dead so I opened the caps of the battery and put few drops of distilled water and then tried to charge it but it didn't work so I took acid from my big 200amps battery and put in my dead battery the battery started working but after 3 hours of charge it is losing volts quickly and not able to power small little dc motor the next day I put some more acid in it the battery is now able to run the motor little bit but when I charge it the battery sounds like boiling and caps pop up and volts quickly started decreasing fast. It is 6v 4.5ah battery but it charges not 10v when I give 6v or 8v on my power supply it wouldn't charge when I give it 10v it started charging and it gets hot from it's positive side but negative side remains cold.

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closed as off-topic by Leon Heller, Marcus Müller, winny, Andy aka, Marla Aug 17 at 13:46

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions on the use of electronic devices are off-topic as this site is intended specifically for questions on electronics design." – Leon Heller, Marcus Müller, Andy aka, Marla
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ What is your question \$\endgroup\$ – Umar Aug 17 at 8:41
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    \$\begingroup\$ Please use periods (".") at the end of a logical sentence. Also, use empty lines to structure your question. This is effectively unreadable. \$\endgroup\$ – Marcus Müller Aug 17 at 8:45
  • \$\begingroup\$ We don't expect every post to be perfect, but posts with correct spelling, punctuation, and grammar are easier to read. They also tend to get read and upvoted more frequently. Remember, you can always go back at any time and edit your post to improve it. See Write to the best of your ability on the site's help pages. SI units named after a person have their symbols capitalised but are lowercase when spelled out. 'V' for volt, 'A' for ampere, 'K' for kelvin, 'Ω' (capital omega) for ohm, etc. Meanwhile 'k' is for kilo. \$\endgroup\$ – Transistor Aug 17 at 10:40
  • \$\begingroup\$ I found an old tyre on a rubbish pile that would fit my bike. I repaired the punctures it had and took it for a ride but I crashed when the tyre split open. \$\endgroup\$ – Andy aka Aug 17 at 11:49
  • \$\begingroup\$ you are describing your adventure with a dead battery ... why are you telling us about it? ... do you have a question that you want to ask? \$\endgroup\$ – jsotola Aug 17 at 16:08
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You have described a "scrap" / "dead" / "defunct" battery.

Take it to a proper recycling place / depot / center.

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