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enter image description here

The colors are black, light green, green, red and silver (looks more like gray). I am not sure which side to start reading the values from. Both ends seem to be symmetrical.

Moreover, I have never seen light green on any color code charts. i am thinking that the manufacturer might have intended this to be yellow (but I am not sure).

I know the basic color code and have also worked with simple electronic circuits, but, this resistor got me really confused. I looked up various sites to do some research, but ended up with more questions than answers.

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    \$\begingroup\$ My guess is either, 4.5 kohms x 0.05% (if second color is yellow) or, 5.5 kohms x 0.05% (if second color is green). \$\endgroup\$ – BlueKryptonite Aug 27 '19 at 23:43
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    \$\begingroup\$ I suspect that you should be reading it the other way, since grey-red translates to 82, which is a standard value in the resistor E12 series. Can't help you with the rest though. \$\endgroup\$ – brhans Aug 27 '19 at 23:48
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    \$\begingroup\$ Maybe 8.25 M\$\Omega\$ (gray-red-green-yellow), a standard value in E48, E96 and E192 series. Can't explain the last band, though... looks black but that doesn't make sense... could it be dark brown meaning 1% tolerance (E96), maybe? \$\endgroup\$ – Enric Blanco Aug 28 '19 at 0:06
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    \$\begingroup\$ May be a bleed resistor (seems to be going to ground), and it possibly crosses a high-voltage barrier indicated by the broad white silkscreen. If so, its resistance may be high, as Enric Blanco suggests. \$\endgroup\$ – glen_geek Aug 28 '19 at 0:45
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    \$\begingroup\$ Measure it. It'll be horribly inaccurate in circuit, but it'll get you into the ballpark -- especially if it's an inductor. \$\endgroup\$ – TimWescott Aug 28 '19 at 0:45
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Allowing for distorted colors, I read it as 825 with 4 zeros (sickly yellow), 1 percent (overly dark brown), carbon film (light brownish body); or 8.25M, a standard value. The questionable part is that carbon resistors of this value have such a large tempco that one percent will only be met over a ten degree range (or less).

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I would also go for that as black-yellow is uncommon but gray-red is standard E12. But then 8.25M is also rare. \$\endgroup\$ – Oldfart Aug 28 '19 at 5:28
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I agree with @brhans in the comments on the direction of reading. (Grey, Red, Green, Gold?) and I believe the black band is to indicate that it is a wirewound resistor.

You can see similar markings using the 5th black band in the datasheet for these resistors by Yageo

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  • \$\begingroup\$ The dark band on the end is black and this 1/2 watt resistor is in the part of the circuit that handles 120 volts. \$\endgroup\$ – BlueKryptonite Aug 28 '19 at 3:25
  • \$\begingroup\$ Yes I see, please read the comments of brahns, Enric Blanco & Glen Geek. I agree with them. Are you able to lift one side and use a meter to read it? Since the resistor looks ok, you are in the best position to answer this question... \$\endgroup\$ – narkeleptk Aug 28 '19 at 3:31
  • \$\begingroup\$ Although my multimeter was showing an open circuit for this resistor, it is only because the maximum resistance measurable by the multimeter is 2MOhms. Later on, I figured that one of the reasons for the circuit board to not function correctly is a fusable 1.8 ohm ceramic resistor (RGDU5M-5E), which is showing open circuit. The new problem is that this exact resistor is kind of hard to find. Also, I might have other failed components that caused the fuse to blow in the first place. Thanks again to all, for educating me about the 5-band resistor. That was new information for me. Thanks. \$\endgroup\$ – BlueKryptonite Aug 29 '19 at 2:54
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There is no light green in resistor bands. 0-Blk 1-Brn 2-Red 3-Org 4-Yel 5-Grn 6-Blu 7-Vio 8-Gry 9-Wht It appears that resistor is Gry, Red, Grn 8,200,000 Ohms (8.2 Meg).

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My guess is 8.2M\$\Omega\$ 5%. The black band just indicates the right-hand end, something I've seen before a number of times.

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There are 4 colors that aren't supposed to represent the tolerance values. Black, Orange, Yellow and White. Since the tolerance value is the last digit, your reading can't start from Grey color side.

So, it has to be read as Black ....... Grey. Grey representing the tolerance value.

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The answer is 4.5 kΩ.

First significant figure black = 0

Second significant figure yellow = 4

Third significant figure green = 5

Number of zeroes red = 2

Tolerance silver = 10%

Value is 04500 ohms = 4.5 kΩ

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