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I am creating an interactive art installation in a gallery context using a 12 volts car headlight/windshield washer pump. It basically is a fluid washer pump taken outside of a car into a gallery, activated by the user (or spectator) by a switch (a preferably illuminated momentary push button). The whole setup is to be mounted into an insulated vertical box made of bolted metal racks and transparent plastic, so that no water can really get into it. I chose waterproof components for added safety.

The components are all powered by a 10 amps 12 volts laptop power supply connected to the standard European 220v electrical mains.

I am a total beginner when it comes to electrical engineering. I have never really even connected two cables together but I am quite motivated in learning how to do it.

After doing quite a lot of research, I have designed this circuit prototype (which I join to this post), which includes the pump, a relay, a circuit breaker, a switch and the power supply which is to be connected to 230v European mains electrical outlet. The red cables are positive and blacks are ground. My main question would be: are all the cables connected to the right terminals?

And is my circuit design reliable and safe for random people to use in a gallery context, taking into account the potential presence of a small amount of water ?

Here are the components I am planning on using:

  1. The 10 amps 230v to 12v DC laptop power supply I have (will be isolated from any water by plastic panels): https://www.amazon.de/gp/product/B07JC7MJHV/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
  2. A switch example: https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/12V-16mm-LED-Black-Metal-Push-Button-Panel-Momentary-Switch-Light-Car-Boat-/362525441944?_trksid=p2067104.m45210.l46741 (sub question: Can a higher voltage switch than 12 v be used?)
  3. 12 v waterproof 40 amps Relay: https://www.amazon.de/gp/product/B00M2QK47Y/ref=ox_sc_act_title_3?smid=A258M9JSP6L6E7&psc=1
  4. 12 v waterproof 50 amps Breaker: https://www.amazon.com/ANJOSHI-Circuit-50A-300A-Protection-Inverter/dp/B07K4ZK4VP/ref=pd_day0_hl_107_1/141-5093642-5255831?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B07K4ZK4VP&pd_rd_r=b5db5bcd-ff46-4663-a722-b9c2642abb70&pd_rd_w=EMncz&pd_rd_wg=X9N3j&pf_rd_p=ad07871c-e646-4161-82c7-5ed0d4c85b07&pf_rd_r=SSA0CTQK5SBFV77636NM&psc=1&refRID=SSA0CTQK5SBFV77636NM
  5. Waterproof cable connectors: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Waterproof-Electrical-Connectors-Socket-Marine/dp/B01DVQ2ANO?ref_=fsclp_pl_dp_10
  6. The 12 v headlight washer pump to be powered, tested with the laptop power supply I have and works: https://www.amazon.de/gp/product/B006DHWPOI/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

My questions are:

  1. Is my circuit design correct? Are all the cables connected to the right terminals?
  2. Are these component examples adapted to my usage?
  3. Can a higher voltage rated switch be used in a 12v circuit, all else being equal?
  4. Can I power two systems (the pump and the LED power for the illuminated switch from the same breaker or do I need an additional fuse?

Any advice or help is appreciated to avoid injuring anyone and have a reliable setup that will not break.

Thanks a lotCircuit diagram

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Is my circuit design correct? Are all the cables connected to the right terminals?

Yes.

Are these component examples adapted to my usage?

The breaker won't do anything. If it's a modern supply, it'll do its own current limiting; if its an older supply it'll burn up long before the current gets to 50A. A 15A breaker would be more appropriate, if you don't trust the supply to limit current.

Can a higher voltage rated switch be used in a 12v circuit, all else being equal?

Yes. For the most part, switch voltage (and current) ratings are maximum, not minimum.

Can I power two systems (the pump and the LED power for the illuminated switch from the same breaker or do I need an additional fuse?

One breaker will do. The rule for a protected circuit is that all the wiring is heavy enough to carry the current that the breaker is rated for, or that the wire is inside an enclosure that'll contain the ensuing fire. It sounds like you'll be satisfying both of those rules of thumb.

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