1
\$\begingroup\$

My question is about LJU (Line Jack Unit) aka Rosette.

I am having BSNL (service provider company) copper line broadband in India. In spite of having wired broadband, I get speeds of 6Mbps(download) / 0.75Mbps(upload). Upon raising the issue with officials, they checked & did not find any abnormality at their end. There are no cuts in wire running from DP.

What I did notice is -- there is no LJU (Line Jack Unit) to connect incoming copper line with telephone cable which goes to splitter. What I wish to know is "Whether not having LJU can affect the internet speed?" Thanks.

EDIT:- I am using ASUS DSL N10 E modem.
The first image shows incoming copper wire on left side, which is twisted with phone-wire for making connection, tape applied; phone wire (right side) has RJ11 jack on other end which goes to splitter. I have attached imagesconnection.

splitter

router

\$\endgroup\$

closed as off-topic by brhans, Oleg Mazurov, Chris Stratton, TonyM, Huisman Sep 27 at 10:01

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions on the use of electronic devices are off-topic as this site is intended specifically for questions on electronics design." – brhans, Oleg Mazurov, Chris Stratton, TonyM, Huisman
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1
\$\begingroup\$

Yes, there seems to be a lot of evidence that a proper NTU can affect the broadband speed.

I don't know what the rules are in India, but here in the UK it's BT's responsibility to provide and maintain the NTU that terminates the incoming phone line and consumers aren't allowed to interfere with it. The best results are reckoned to come from having a properly filtered faceplate as part of the NTU because this removes the effect of the telephone wiring as close to the entry point as possible. But in your case I wouldn't really expect a massive improvement in speed, if any, given the short length to the splitter.

But broadband speed is mainly dependent on distance to the DSLAM (either at the exchange or in a street cabinet) and the quality of cabling. Prior to rolling out street cabinets to make shorter connections, it was quite normal to get 6Mbps from broadband - and many people still can't even get that much. Have you asked your provider what speed you should be getting?

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ I asked the provider. My plan is "upto 8 MegaBytes per sec" whereas i am getting 6 Megabits per sec. That means less than 1/8th. \$\endgroup\$ – Vineet Sep 9 at 14:50
  • \$\begingroup\$ It's unusual for broadband speeds to be quoted in bytes per second (probably because bits/second is a much higher number and sounds faster). I suspect someone has got confused and it should be up to 8Mbps. In which case 6Mbps isn't unreasonable. \$\endgroup\$ – Finbarr Sep 9 at 16:00
  • \$\begingroup\$ Thanks for your input. I will recheck with my ISP. \$\endgroup\$ – Vineet Sep 11 at 5:03
0
\$\begingroup\$

If your internet access is based on xDSL, any attenuation will impact the data rate you can accomplish. The data rate is usually handshaked between your xDSL Modem and the DSLAM (or whatever COE is used).

I would say it heavily depends on how you connect the copper wires to the splitter and how high quality the connection is.

I guess you're using either screw-terminals or other plugin-type direct wire terminals. Both should fit the purpose and I don't think it has great impact on the attainable data rate.

If you could share more info on your type of internet access and maybe a photo of your CPE, including the copper cables and the splitter unit and how it is connected, that might help to give a more detailed answer.

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ I have added images and router name. The first image shows incoming copper wire on left side, which is twisted with phone-wire for making connection, tape applied; phone wire (right side) has RJ11 jack on other end which goes to splitter. Thanks. \$\endgroup\$ – Vineet Sep 9 at 10:12
  • \$\begingroup\$ Apparently your photos are not very detailed w.r.t. the actual wire cabling. \$\endgroup\$ – aslmx Sep 9 at 10:31

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.