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I live in India, the voltage supply in houses is 220V.

Sometimes, for example in my washing machine, when it is full of water and I put my hand in it, I get a feeling like a thorn/tiny nail is piercing my finger near nails. Same happens if some liquid is touch inside freezer.

Sometimes it happens when I even touch the body of fridge.

It doesn't give a shock, but I'm serious about it. Is it a low level of shock or is it something else?

It happens when the appliances are plugged in.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Bad earthing is quite often the problem. \$\endgroup\$ – Andy aka Sep 13 at 11:38
  • \$\begingroup\$ My washing machine has two pin plug. Is it the cause? \$\endgroup\$ – Vikas Sep 13 at 11:52
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    \$\begingroup\$ Probably the cause. \$\endgroup\$ – Andy aka Sep 13 at 11:55
  • \$\begingroup\$ What about the plug on the fridge and freezer? \$\endgroup\$ – HandyHowie Sep 13 at 12:20
  • \$\begingroup\$ @HandyHowie it has 3 pin plug. \$\endgroup\$ – Vikas Sep 13 at 13:49
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Its electricity flowing through your hand via the water and affecting your nervous system.

In the shower in my gf's parents house I would often get a tingling from touching the faucet. I was sure they didn't want me dating their daughter! It turned out a wire was touching the metal drop ceiling support above the shower and the metal support had somehow touched a drain somewhere, thus completing me in the circuit. The tub was enamel coated cast iron.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Okay, but doubt is, why I'm not getting (may we never get one) a strong shock? Why only a needle on finger like feeling? \$\endgroup\$ – Vikas Sep 13 at 15:07
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Vikas, you didn't state your country or the voltage at the plug so I don't know if your washer is 240V or 230V or 120V but since you notice the problem with your fridge also (and it's not static discharge), then it seems to be a condition of your house wiring. Because your plug is 2 wire, you have no earth wire (also known as ground and protective earth). It seems to be leakage current from the appliance to the metal enclosure and your body becomes a path of this leakage when you touch it. The purpose of the earth wire is to provide a return path for leakage currents or in the event of a short to the metal enclosure. If your home does not have 3 wire receptacles then you will need an electrician to wire them in.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Edited. Kindly check. \$\endgroup\$ – Vikas Sep 13 at 13:51
  • \$\begingroup\$ If possible have an electrician convert the washer to 3 pin with the earth tied to the metal enclosure. It may also indicate a failure developing with your washer. \$\endgroup\$ – Rob B. Sep 13 at 15:06
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Your appliance is probably not correctly grounded, either a problem within the appliance or in your domestic supply. I would suggest either a rubber mat or a pair of rubber Wellington boots.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Just asking. When there's rubber mat, and there's water on it and a water line is drawn on it that travel to the edge of mat and contacts the Earth (floor) and you are barefoot on mat, not connected to water line, will it give me shock since water is conductor? Or no effect of water? \$\endgroup\$ – Vikas Sep 13 at 15:05
  • \$\begingroup\$ It is always possible to find a case where an insulation precaution will not work. If you have that level of knowledge come up with your own precautions. The rubber wellies are a good one. \$\endgroup\$ – RoyC Sep 13 at 16:49
  • \$\begingroup\$ I meant will it give shock in that case? I'm not sure. \$\endgroup\$ – Vikas Sep 14 at 3:30

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