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Is it possible to use a 3 Pole 4 Position rotary Switch to do the following on the respective positions:

  1. Send the Aux signal through normally
  2. Invert Left and Right
  3. Send the Left Signal to both outputs
  4. Send the Right Signal to both outputs

Please excuse the crude drawing, I was just wondering, if on position one, for example, the left signal then passes through the yellow link into the right channel and cause interference. If so, how could this be done correctly?

Rotary switch diagram

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  • \$\begingroup\$ When you say "invert", do you mean "swap"? If so, your wiring looks fine. (To me, "invert" would imply changing the polarity of the signal.) \$\endgroup\$ – Dave Tweed Sep 22 at 12:35
  • \$\begingroup\$ Yes I meant that the left output receives the right signal and vice versa. What confuses me is that if you follow the blue wire on position one, the signal is then travelling to the right output via the red wire, right? Would that not cause the signals to mix at any position? \$\endgroup\$ – Roman Stadler Sep 22 at 13:42
  • \$\begingroup\$ Ah, I see what you mean. See my answer below. \$\endgroup\$ – Dave Tweed Sep 22 at 14:19
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It would make more sense if you connect the outputs to the wipers of the switches.

schematic

simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab

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No, this won't work. Both your yellow and red wires are permanently shorting the Left and Right outputs. They will always be the same, regardless of switch position. You may have the right idea but your illustration does not show it, and I'm not sure you can accomplish what you want with a mechanical switch. Is your AUX input mono or stereo?

It would be much better if you used the built-in schematic editor to draw a proper circuit diagram, clearing showing all three poles.

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