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I am trying to fix an old radio that my girlfriend just bought. It's from around 1964. I'm just a normal electrician and I am not used to fixing things like this.

Radio model: Huldra 7-45 Skapmodell

Is there anything I should keep in mind before powering it up for the first time. In my experience, capacitors tend to fail. Is a capacitor from 1964 considered old? Should I replace any of them before powering up?

I can probably test the vacuum-tubes later with the power on.

I'm aware of the 400VDC that is probably lurking around that thing.

EDITS: I have been looking over the capacitors and many of them are named HUNTS, should I replace them too?

Here is a list of all the capacitors:
What do I have to keep in mind when trying to find replacements for them?
Also, is this the same, 002µF and 02µF, or does the amount of 0 matter?

HUNTS: 0.008µF 150V | 02µF 150V | 05µF 150V | 01µF 400V | 002µF 400V | 003µF 400V | 04µF 400V | 005µF 400V | 008µF 400V | 0015µF 400V | 500pF 600V.
Rifa Miniprint: 0.22µF 200V | 0.47µF 200V | 0.022µF 400V. B 41 283: 100µF 15V.
Metallic ones: 5µF 100/110 | 50µF 350V | 5µF 400V.

enter image description here

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    \$\begingroup\$ Rifa capacitors do not have the best reputation. vintage-radio.net/forum/showthread.php?t=90674 \$\endgroup\$ – Peter Smith Sep 22 '19 at 15:07
  • \$\begingroup\$ You probably might as well just fire it up and see how it works. It might not sound as well as if it had new capacitors, but it might just work unless you for sure know it's broken. Then I would recommend just going through and replacing all the aluminum can capacitors. The only issue there is modern ones will be much smaller and they won't fit the footprints identically. \$\endgroup\$ – MadHatter Sep 22 '19 at 15:48
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    \$\begingroup\$ The chassis may be at 400V. Be careful. \$\endgroup\$ – Janka Sep 22 '19 at 16:18
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    \$\begingroup\$ This is not really on topic here, both because repair questions about undocumented products are generally off topic, and because your question is vague and general, lacking the specificity to which this site is dedicated. You should likely find a forum site where people who repair antique receivers discuss their experiences. You may also be able to learn some things from those who repair older ham gear, though there are differences as well. \$\endgroup\$ – Chris Stratton Sep 22 '19 at 17:33
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Absolutely replace the ones marked Rifa Miniprint; I don't know about the electrolytics but Rifa's film capacitors are notoriously unreliable and I can see a visible crack on the one in the second image (which is a sign that it's failing and ought to be replaced).

I would also replace the electrolytics as a manner of course, as electrolytic caps tend to dry out over time (reducing capacitance and increasing ESR) and being 55 years old certainly isn't doing them any favors.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Hunts capacitors don't exactly have a stellar reputation either: enough to be a running joke in the UK. \$\endgroup\$ – Dan Sheppard Sep 22 '19 at 19:01
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The capacitor you pointed out seems to be ceramic(the brown ones), just covered in some insulator. Ceramic capacitors generally don't fail even after long term storage.

And as for metallic ones they are electrolytic, and I would doubt their reliability.

Would suggest just desolder them and check them with a multimeter.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Those Rifa ones that you call ceramic are actually film capacitors, and that particular brand of film capacitors is notoriously unreliable. I'd suspect those film caps even more than the electrolytic ones, even! \$\endgroup\$ – Hearth Sep 22 '19 at 16:19
  • \$\begingroup\$ Oh, sorry mate I hadn't seen it properly. Yeah, even the film ones do have a similar life to that of ceramic. and no need to worry about them being dying off. \$\endgroup\$ – muralidharreddy challa Sep 22 '19 at 16:28
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    \$\begingroup\$ Film caps have a similar lifespan to ceramic ones, yes, but specifically Rifa film caps are known for having a very short lifespan. Rifa did not make good capacitors. \$\endgroup\$ – Hearth Sep 22 '19 at 16:51

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