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I want to clean a SO-DIMM memory that was contaminated with bottled drinking water. This was not "mineral water" intended for drinking. It was the high volume bottled drinking water from one of the world's largest "soda" companies. This device stopped working after the contamination. Obviously this water is not very dirty but the malfunction is strongly associated with a single contamination event.

Will it be effective to use 70% isopropyl alcohol available in common drugstores or must I use a 99.9% product which is certainly available in my area but less convenient.

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    \$\begingroup\$ I will be surprised if cleaining with alcohol helps. You might try baking the part at just over 100 C (212 F) for ... I dunno, an hour or so. But if the contamination happened when the chip was turned on, it might have simply caused permanent damage and no amount of cleaning or drying it out will recover it. \$\endgroup\$ – The Photon Sep 27 '19 at 16:04
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    \$\begingroup\$ Water by itself is unlikely to cause the malfunction. Powering the circuit when wet is the problem. FWIW I have machine-washed several USB sticks and these kept working after dried up. \$\endgroup\$ – Eugene Sh. Sep 27 '19 at 16:06
  • \$\begingroup\$ It was powered off. I allowed evaporation for several hours. It then worked intermittently but now is completely dead. \$\endgroup\$ – H2ONaCl Sep 27 '19 at 16:07
  • \$\begingroup\$ Was the DIMM the only thing contaminated? The circuit board it plugs into wasn't involved? \$\endgroup\$ – The Photon Sep 27 '19 at 16:08
  • \$\begingroup\$ With a new memory the board works. \$\endgroup\$ – H2ONaCl Sep 27 '19 at 16:09
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You can use deionized water to clean off PCB's, as long as the IC's themselves are not moisture sensitive, so 70% might work. I would use 90% Isopropyl alcohol if I were at home for cleaning, you don't need 99%. I would then slowly heat the part to remove the water, or use a dessicant pack.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ alcohol itself is a fairly strong dessicant. \$\endgroup\$ – Jasen Sep 27 '19 at 20:45

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