5
\$\begingroup\$

I am trying to develop something to control an old antenna rotator, and it has a connector like this one:

Connector

It does not seem to be a simple audio connector, but is more or less of the same size. What it its name? Is it possible to find a male connector for it nowadays?

Thank you in advantage!

\$\endgroup\$
  • 6
    \$\begingroup\$ Please add dimensions. It looks like a common 8 pin DIN connector \$\endgroup\$ – Huisman Sep 28 '19 at 21:05
34
\$\begingroup\$

enter image description here

Figure 1. An 8-pin DIN connector (IEC 60574-18).

enter image description here

Figure 2. Dimensions. Source: Amphenol.

enter image description here

Figure 3. The female version has slots to accomodate the simple flat forked contacts visible in the three left sockets.

\$\endgroup\$
  • 5
    \$\begingroup\$ @user3141592: Some connectors use flat fork-shaped contacts in the female connector. The slots extending from the circular holes will hold the flat teeth of the terminal. \$\endgroup\$ – Peter Bennett Sep 28 '19 at 21:15
  • 5
    \$\begingroup\$ Nearly all DIN sockets that I've seen had holes shaped like this. \$\endgroup\$ – user1686 Sep 29 '19 at 7:14
  • 5
    \$\begingroup\$ It is called a DIN connector because they are notorious for becoming intermittent- if they are are used for audio signals, they cause a DIN. \$\endgroup\$ – rackandboneman Sep 29 '19 at 12:10
  • 6
    \$\begingroup\$ I am Deutsch, I know. But I think my definition holds up in practice :) \$\endgroup\$ – rackandboneman Sep 29 '19 at 15:10
  • 4
    \$\begingroup\$ @rackandboneman DIN = Deutsches Institut für Normung \$\endgroup\$ – roetnig Sep 29 '19 at 18:35
14
\$\begingroup\$

It is a DIN connector, commonly used for all connections to amplifiers, remote cabled signal sources, ie turntables, tuners, pre-amplifiers, etc basically used with multicore screened cables carrying low level signals in the audio range. Also some control signals for remote CD players in the car audio scenario. Later RCA coaxial connectors were used for individual audio or video channels. This connector hails from the 1979-90s you need to be able to solder well.

There were many versions of DIN connector with more or less pins Pins 1,2 and 3 were the original left and right audio input with pin 2 as common earth. (Pin 2 is also often connected to the housing screen) These may still be available from RS type shops like here: https://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/din-connectors/0463394/ Though you may need the non Pro version without the locking ring, depends upon your socket. Some types have a press in latch/lock too. Just search on DIN connector. (In case it is of interested DIN stands for Deutsche Industrie Norm) the German equivalent of BS) they were the standards adopted by most of Europe for the audio and automotive industries) I was in the automotive side in Car audio many many years ago)
Note there is an established use for each pin, but it does not matter in your case, be aware of whether you are looking at the front or back of plug or socket when wiring it up. I suggest a look at WikiPedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DIN_connector this has all types.

\$\endgroup\$
  • 4
    \$\begingroup\$ "commonly used for..." And let's not forget keyboards on early PCs. \$\endgroup\$ – WhatRoughBeast Sep 29 '19 at 13:33
  • 3
    \$\begingroup\$ @WhatRoughBeast though just for completeness it's worth noting that the IBM keyboard originally used a 5-pin version of the connector and then later a 6-pin smaller "mini-DIN" version. \$\endgroup\$ – Moshe Katz Sep 29 '19 at 21:42
  • 3
    \$\begingroup\$ @MosheKatz: For even more completeness, the mini-DIN-6 connector commonly used for computer mice and keyboards until recently is much better known as the PS/2 connector, after its original use case. They're also not the only mini-DIN connectors to have been commonly used for mice and keyboards; all Macs from the mid-1980s through the late 1990s used ADB for mice and keyboards, which used a mini-DIN-4 connector (the same as used for S-video - in fact, ADB and S-video cables are interchangeable!). \$\endgroup\$ – Sean Sep 30 '19 at 3:27

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.