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I am trying to build a boost converter that would output a high DC voltage (several hundreds). My concern is that I should use a transformer, but how should I implement it so that DC voltage input is possible? Do I need to use an DC/AC inverter before the transformer?

I've been told that an isolation transformer can take DC voltage..

Thank you in advance.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Look into flyback converters. \$\endgroup\$ – MadHatter Oct 5 '19 at 21:26
  • \$\begingroup\$ You need a special transformer with an air gap. \$\endgroup\$ – Janka Oct 5 '19 at 21:34
  • \$\begingroup\$ @MadHatter Don't flyback converters use coupled inductors, not transformers? \$\endgroup\$ – Honeybutter Oct 5 '19 at 21:38
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Janka Can you specify what you mean by an air gap? Where can I find such transformers? \$\endgroup\$ – Honeybutter Oct 5 '19 at 21:39
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Honeybutter Typically you wind one or buy one, you can get something like an EE core of ferrite. Your right a flyback is a coupled inductor, but they work well for <50W power systems that require >5x boost or reduction of voltage. I recently used a simple flyback design for a 24V to 400V Supply to drive a tube amplifier. \$\endgroup\$ – MadHatter Oct 5 '19 at 21:43
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You can look for a forward converter, which is more energy efficient than a flyback converter and fits your needs:

enter image description here

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I read about this and it seems to work like a buck converter, not a boost converter. \$\endgroup\$ – Honeybutter Oct 6 '19 at 1:48
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Honeybutter Sort of, but you have a turns ratio so you can have an output voltage higher than the input. But a flyback is the simplest, cheapest option unless you need lots of output power (>~50W) \$\endgroup\$ – John D Oct 6 '19 at 2:03
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Honeybutter You have to adjust the turns ratio, and thus you can step-up or down your voltage, with much less magnetic cost and fits well if you want to handle more power \$\endgroup\$ – Iron Maiden Oct 6 '19 at 2:35
  • \$\begingroup\$ @JohnD Thank you for the reply. Do you know the relevant equation for the output voltage? \$\endgroup\$ – Honeybutter Oct 6 '19 at 8:56
  • \$\begingroup\$ @IronMaiden If I want to go up to 1000V, will that be possible? \$\endgroup\$ – Honeybutter Oct 6 '19 at 8:58

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