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I am trying to find an MCU in which there are some specific requirements for I/O peripherals (such as UARTs, SPI, I2C, etc). I also want to be able to search by the footprint size. Should I go to each popular MCU website and search from their selection list or is there any other possible way to do that?

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    \$\begingroup\$ You probably don't want the smallest footprint, but rather the unspecified smallest footprint you and your chosen assembler are prepared to work with - otherwise you can solve this with a 35-ball WLCSP smaller than 3 millimeters on each side, and perhaps something smaller yet. Lines like (for example) SAMD that have multi-mode serial engines will likely get you more in a small package than those like (for example) STM32 that tend to differentiate UART, SPI, and I2C engines. \$\endgroup\$ – Chris Stratton Oct 12 at 14:57
  • \$\begingroup\$ If you want a certain exact set of requirements, then one option, not depending on some vendor predictively reading your mind, is to program your own system into an FPGA logic design for your exact requirements. \$\endgroup\$ – hotpaw2 Oct 12 at 17:20
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The strategy would indeed be to go to the various manufacturer web sites and use their parametric search engines to narrow down the selection to 4 UARTS. Each manufacturer will have a slightly different search facility so you have adapt to that.

One benefit here is that the number of main MCU manufacturers has been reduced in the recent decade due to companies either joining forces or some exiting the market.

For small footprints it can often be useful to consider the SiLabs1 offerings. The Leopard Gecko series of ARM core MCUs offer five UARTs in QFN64 or QFP64 packages.

1No affiliation with company but user of their products.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Whoever is down voting here needs to step forward and say why. This question and answers here seem very much on-topic as the OP is asking how to search and not where to purchase. \$\endgroup\$ – Michael Karas Oct 12 at 13:36
  • \$\begingroup\$ I didn't downvote but the very last sentence of the question is a shopping question, in my opinion. I did vote to close the question, because I believe that the OP is really hoping someone will just give them a part number. Maybe I'll edit the question... \$\endgroup\$ – Elliot Alderson Oct 12 at 15:11
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There are a number of websites that do what you want; the ones I use most often (no affiliation) are Digi-key and Mouser. Both of these offer parametric search by both functions and footprint.

You can also use individual manufacturer's sites, which will likely have more parts available, but distributors like those linked above sell parts from many different manufacturers, and allow you to directly compare parts from different manufacturers as well.

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I don't think there are such website, at least they will not be supported by major brands, since it will show both their advantages, but also disadvantages compared to other MCUs.

One MCU that has 4 UARTS is the ATmega2560, known from the Arduino Mega 2560, which has 4 UARTs. (see also the comment of Marcus Miller below).

ST.com also has many MCUs having (at least) 4 UARTs, and it has an easy search tool which can be found here: ST MCU Finder. You have to install it though (there is also an Android app which can do the same, with the same name).

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  • \$\begingroup\$ @MichaelKaras (actually at the downvoter of both my answer as Michael's): I fully copy the remark of Michael Karas above. \$\endgroup\$ – Michel Keijzers Oct 12 at 13:57
  • \$\begingroup\$ The Arduino Mega 2560 is not an MCU. \$\endgroup\$ – Hearth Oct 12 at 15:21
  • \$\begingroup\$ @hearth thanks I adapted my answer \$\endgroup\$ – Michel Keijzers Oct 12 at 15:57
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    \$\begingroup\$ I'm pretty sure the most well-known MCU is not the ATMega 2560, as I didn't know hell about it, but the Intel MCS-51, father of all MCUs of the large 8051 family. Anyway, that's a purely subjective "fact", and I think your answer would do better without claiming that, so that trolls like me don't start arguing about it: "A pretty well-known MCU is the ..." would work just as well without making (unverifiable to false) claims :) But this is really just nitpicking. \$\endgroup\$ – Marcus Müller Oct 14 at 7:59
  • \$\begingroup\$ @MarcusMüller Thanks for that update. I heard only of the 8051 but never used it. I'm (regarding electronics) an amateur, so for me the Arduino (and bit STM32) is most well known, but I can imagine for (seasoned) electronics engineers the 8051 (and PIC or others) are most well known, so good point to adapt my subjective sentence. \$\endgroup\$ – Michel Keijzers Oct 14 at 8:43

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