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Mosfets are pretty cool but they are either designed for circuit boards or for breadboard's. Is there a version of a mosfet that can be used for slightly thicker wires than what would be usually found to a mosfet(wires that can fit within a breadboard )

of course there are relays but thry dont have the switching speed of a mosfet and they make a lot of noise

basically a mosfet that can be connected to wires that are the size that usally relays are connected to.

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closed as unclear what you're asking by pipe, John D, Voltage Spike, Phil G, Mitu Raj Oct 18 at 4:11

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    \$\begingroup\$ AWG are you talking about? Use a TO220 variant, bend its legs and solder wires to it? \$\endgroup\$ – Huisman Oct 17 at 20:19
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    \$\begingroup\$ I think you might be interested in solid state relays \$\endgroup\$ – Eugene Sh. Oct 17 at 20:19
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    \$\begingroup\$ You don't want breadboard-sized mosfets but you want mosfets for use with wires that can fit on a breadboard? \$\endgroup\$ – pipe Oct 17 at 20:20
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    \$\begingroup\$ "or they are designed for breaboards": Let me assure you, nobody designs mosfets for breadboards... Generally, chances are, nobody designs semiconductor devices for breadboards; breadboards are designed to work (with a bit of luck) with components that were meant for through-hole PCB mounting (and very few "hobbyist" devices). \$\endgroup\$ – Marcus Müller Oct 17 at 20:53
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    \$\begingroup\$ MOSFETs in SOT-227 packages. They have screw terminals and bolt holes to mount to heatsink. They are also very expensive. Convenient though. \$\endgroup\$ – DKNguyen Oct 17 at 21:09
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Crimping straight to MOSFETs is a bad idea as it's likely to damage leads. Soldering to high current leads is even a worse idea as the high resistance could cause thermal failures.

What you want is a MOSFET PCB with Screw Terminals. Something like this. Many can be found on Ebay, Amazon etc.

enter image description here

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Long wires add inductance, which is a bad idea especially on the gate. This may create an Involuntary Oscillator. When the FET is oscillating, it is in linear mode, dissipating a lot more heat than in switching mode... and this can destroy the FET. A gate resistor close to the FET is a good idea.

A better option for quick and (very) dirty prototyping is to grab a piece of copper clad pcb (cut to size) and an xacto knife, and slice the copper to make three copper pads, one per pin. Then cut the Gate pad in two and add a resistor. Then solder the FET and wires, and mount everything on a heatsink, ensuring the bit of PCB is fastened by something other than the FET's pins, maybe a screw (not shown on crappy drawing below).

enter image description here

Of course if you're not in a hurry, a readymade PCB like EasyOhm recommends is nicer.

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You don't want to solder lead frame FETS to thick wires that can move. The stress can damage the internal wire bonds when stress and heat are applied.

It needs to be THT for breadboards or SMD with a solid epoxy fiberglass substrate or equiv.

But something might be possible to get a PCB test coupon and then add heatsink and interface to a relay socket with pins to emulate a RELAY. Is that what you have in mind?

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