0
\$\begingroup\$

Let's say I have a conductive metal sphere connected to a 50Hz 1kVrms AC Power Source referenced to Earth ground. About 3cm away, there's an identical metal sphere suspended by a non-conductive material. Does the floating conductor gain a charge from an electric field from the source? What is it's approximate voltage against ground?

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ we need to know the size of the sphere. And how far away to GND. You have a capacitive voltage divider. \$\endgroup\$ – analogsystemsrf Oct 25 '19 at 17:11
0
\$\begingroup\$

There is capacitive coupling between the two. Yes there would be a voltage measured from the sphere to earth. Here is a good paper that describes this mechanism in regards to induced voltage on transmission lines.

|improve this answer|||||
\$\endgroup\$
0
\$\begingroup\$

There is capacitative coupling between the two spheres and between the floating sphere and ground. The floating sphere does gain charge from an electric field from the AC source sphere. This configuration creates a capacitative voltage divider. To find the voltage on the floating sphere, both of these capacitances need to be calculated using dimensions that aren't provided in the question. The equation for the voltage amplitude is:

$$ V_{floating}=V_{source}*\frac{C_1}{C_1+C_2} $$ where C1 is the capacitance between the two spheres and C2 is the capacitance between the floating sphere and Earth. This equation works for both AC and DC voltage values.

|improve this answer|||||
\$\endgroup\$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.