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Is it basically, phase angle / angular frequency?

Also for a ac circuit with a single inductor is the phase angle going to be always 90degres, likewise with a circuit with a single capacitor?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Yes, where phase angle is in radians; and yes, 90 deg for C and for L. \$\endgroup\$ – Chu Nov 1 '19 at 13:28
  • \$\begingroup\$ Thanks, so (pie /2)/ angular frequency? \$\endgroup\$ – Nexus6 Nov 1 '19 at 13:30
  • \$\begingroup\$ yes............ \$\endgroup\$ – Chu Nov 1 '19 at 14:22
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For sinusoidal AC circuit, a useful term to remember is: -

C I V I L

  • For a (C)apacitor I leads V.
  • V leads I for an inductor (L)

In both cases, the leading/lagging is 90 degrees.

If the inductor or capacitor has resistive losses then the phase angle magnitude will be less than 90 degrees.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ What about an ac circuit with a single resistor? Is the phase angle 0 in that case? \$\endgroup\$ – Nexus6 Nov 1 '19 at 13:32
  • \$\begingroup\$ Yes it is @Nexus6 \$\endgroup\$ – Andy aka Nov 1 '19 at 13:36
  • \$\begingroup\$ Thank you @Andy aka's \$\endgroup\$ – Nexus6 Nov 1 '19 at 13:37
  • \$\begingroup\$ I am getting a complex infinity error when I enter into calculator, (pie/0)/150pie \$\endgroup\$ – Nexus6 Nov 1 '19 at 13:56
  • \$\begingroup\$ "pie/0" = infinity \$\endgroup\$ – Andy aka Nov 1 '19 at 14:12

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