0
\$\begingroup\$

Does a "frequency-modulated" signal mean that the frequency isn't consistent? and therefore it has a specific bandwidth of frequencies is can cover??

\$\endgroup\$
2
  • \$\begingroup\$ the change in PHASE is named BETA, computed as deltaF/Frequencyof Modulation. Thus if deltaF if 75,000Hz and the (music) tone causing that is only 150Hertz, the change in phase if 75,000 / 150 = 500 radians. \$\endgroup\$ Nov 2 '19 at 6:17
  • \$\begingroup\$ Have a look at the MFSK section :) w1hkj.com/modes \$\endgroup\$
    – filo
    Nov 2 '19 at 9:20
1
\$\begingroup\$

Frequency modulated means the instantaneous frequency of the signal is varied, with the instantaneous frequency carrying the information in the signal. This instantaneous frequency will only be of a limited range. If you provide more context we could help more.

therefore it has a specific bandwidth of frequencies is can cover

This is true of all signals. All signals have a specific bandwidth (aka range of frequency components that make up the signal via fourier transforms). Even amplitude modulated signals where the instantaneous frequency is constant (the carrier) have a bandwidth of frequency components that compose the signal.

\$\endgroup\$
2
\$\begingroup\$

A frequency modulated signal means that the frequency is shifted around a carrier frequency. This can be done digitally or via analog multiplication.

What it looks like is a sine wave speeding up or slowing down.

enter image description here Source: http://www.justscience.in/articles/what-are-the-applications-of-frequency-modulation/2017/06/02

Yes, it normally has a specific bandwidth, some of the reasons being is radio licenses and bandwidth are in short supply (there are a limited number of frequency ranges). With frequeny modulation one can transmit more information in a given section of bandwidth. Most digital wireless communication uses frequency modulation.

\$\endgroup\$
0
\$\begingroup\$

Yes, it is a range of frequencies that are to be expected. In other words, frequency is a function of the modulated signal (or "input signal" if you want).

\$\endgroup\$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.