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For my application, I need to deploy many sensors and a motor. So I chose the 1-wire bus protocol from Dallas/Maxim. Also, I am using temperature sensors which support one-wire protocol. So I thought to design a custom PCB - block diagram below.

block diagram

But then I am not sure if it is a good option. I have a few questions:

  • Should I use this protocol even though it is slower than I2C?

  • Is it reliable?

  • How do I interface a normal device (motor) to the 1-wire bus? Are there any modules I can use for it?
  • Is it possible for any other protocol to be used, like CAN protocol?

Here is my design consideration. It receives the duty cycle in percentage and the frequency and saves it until a new duty cycle input is given. A DAC converts this data to an analog value, supplies it to a PWM generator (duty cycle and frequency) and these signals are used to drive the motor.

I am seeking suggestions about this protocol, design and modules I could use.

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Should I use this protocol even though it is slower than I2C?

That depends. How often do you need to send a new value to the motor? Is there a minimum latency? Is this safety-critical?

Is it reliable?

Provided you follow the guidelines, yes.

How do I interface a normal device (motor) to the 1-wire bus? Are there any modules I can use for it?

You'll probably need to build such a thing from a microcontroller.

Depending on the size of your motor, you may get better results with DCC - it's designed specifically to control the 12V motors used in model trains.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I just wanted to be sure if I design accordingly as the guideline describes, the system would be reliable. also, I don't want a costly microcontroller for this small use-case. I found this device list from Dallas and I don't know any of this could be useful for my case. here is the list maximintegrated.com/en/pl_list.cfm/filter/21 \$\endgroup\$ Nov 5, 2019 at 18:09

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