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Photo 1 of unidentified component

Photo 2 of unidentified component

This component has 4 legs. I don't know what it is, 2 of them go to VCC and GND, the rest of them I don't know.

What is this thing?

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    \$\begingroup\$ If there are 4 leads it is likely a full wave rectifier (4 diodes). \$\endgroup\$ – Nedd Nov 10 '19 at 8:43
  • \$\begingroup\$ thanks man.. it helped me a lot \$\endgroup\$ – Ravikiran Nov 10 '19 at 8:48
  • \$\begingroup\$ Why is this used in a DC Circuit .. i am using an external 12v 2amps adapter to power the board .. then what is the use of this full wave W10 \$\endgroup\$ – Ravikiran Nov 10 '19 at 8:56
  • \$\begingroup\$ See answer added below. \$\endgroup\$ – Nedd Nov 10 '19 at 8:59
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Nedd can you please explain to me why this full-wave rectifier is used in the DC circuit, I mean I know that a full-wave rectifier is used to convert AC to DC. But in my case, I am powering the PCB with 12v and 2 amps adapter. This full-wave rectifier already presents in the adapter and it has converted the AC to DC. So why are we using it again in this DC powered circuit? \$\endgroup\$ – Ravikiran Nov 10 '19 at 9:54
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As in the comment the part is likely a full wave rectifier. The markings also show that the part is UL recognized, so it might be used to connect to an AC mains line. If you are replacing the part you should find a similar part that is also UL recognized. The voltage rating is likely 2 or more times the input voltage.

The part could even be used to allow the option of connecting either an AC or DC input. The full wave rectifier would insure that either type is routed correctly into your system.

The exact part and data sheet is available here:
https://micindia.com/productSearch.jsp?index=5&prodCat=&prodSubCat1=&prodSubCat2=&partNo=W10G

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  • \$\begingroup\$ can you please explain to me why this full-wave rectifier is used in the DC circuit, I mean I know that a full-wave rectifier is used to convert AC to DC. But in my case, I am powering the PCB with 12v and 2 amps adapter. This full-wave rectifier already presents in the adapter and it has converted the AC to DC. So why are we using it again in this DC powered circuit? \$\endgroup\$ – Ravikiran Nov 10 '19 at 9:48
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    \$\begingroup\$ As listed above there may be an option to use an AC supply. Another possibility is that it provides protection to the circuitry in case a DC supply were connected in reverse, (In that case the correct + and - lines would be re-routed correctly. \$\endgroup\$ – Nedd Nov 10 '19 at 10:32

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