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I want to use a full-wave bridge rectifier. My circuit needs 2 amps of current and operates at 12volts (12V @ 2A). I found this https://www.tanotis.com/products/vishay-2w01g-e4-51-bridge-rectifier-diode-single-100-v-2-a-through-hole-1-v-4-pins?gclid=CjwKCAiAzanuBRAZEiwA5yf4ujDS2suLmVHQSYIiL1mhfKOS6jPyQ9xhstmW5uRF4465WDaRHoD6bhoCjXsQAvD_BwE and now I doubt whether it can deliver or allow me to pass 12V via it or not. And please correct me if am asking a dumb question. I am a computer science student and I have no much experience with these things. I am on my way to learn things so please correct me if this is a dumb question.

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It means that a voltage drop on the rectifier is 1V when delivering 2A. So the output voltage is input voltage subtracted by voltage drop.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Okay, It means that if pass 12 V then the output voltage would be 11V right ? \$\endgroup\$ – Ravikiran Nov 12 '19 at 11:20
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    \$\begingroup\$ If you pass DC, then yes. But since you use a bridge rectifier, I suppose the voltage is AC, then the answer is no. It will be somewhere 16V. \$\endgroup\$ – Marko Buršič Nov 12 '19 at 11:25
  • \$\begingroup\$ yes, I am passing DC current for Reverse polarity Protection to my circuit. Thank you so much for the answer. \$\endgroup\$ – Ravikiran Nov 12 '19 at 11:28

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