0
\$\begingroup\$

So I am basically developing an interactive game and the game is going to have an external input in the form of a mobile phone cover. Right now, I am using push buttons as the main input. I do, however, wish to include a force or pressure sensor and am exploring the options available to me.

What I want to know is how could this sensor https://www.mantech.co.za/ProductInfo.aspx?Item=15M0057 be used for the application? Would it be possible and if so, how? I have tried reading up about this sensor but I can't seem to find much information on how to use it. Could someone who has used something similar provide some tips on this matter and also tell me if there is scope for integrating this sensor into a mobile phone cover?

Any help would be appreciated enter image description here

\$\endgroup\$
13
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ You'd have to be a lot more clear about what the user is doing that you want to sense. \$\endgroup\$ – Dave Tweed Nov 19 '19 at 18:29
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Your post is too vague. You say you want a force or pressure (presumably contact pressure since that is synonmous with force) sensor, but then you post an air pressure sensor which is not the same thing. Because if you are actually after contact pressure, an air pressure sensor is cumbersome roundabout way to do it. \$\endgroup\$ – DKNguyen Nov 19 '19 at 18:31
  • \$\begingroup\$ @DKNguyen Oh, it is air pressure sensor? Not very clear from the description, but if it is, then it is quite useless for the "application"... \$\endgroup\$ – Eugene Sh. Nov 19 '19 at 18:33
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ @EugeneSh. Well the picture is an obviously an air pressure sensor, and I've only ever seen gaseous pressure sensors classified as "differential", with gauge, vacuum, or absolute being the other three classifications specific to such sensors. Checking the link and datasheets therein confirms this. \$\endgroup\$ – DKNguyen Nov 19 '19 at 18:35
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ If contact pressure is your goal, use a strain gauge or conductive foam. It's far thinner. \$\endgroup\$ – DKNguyen Nov 19 '19 at 18:38
0
\$\begingroup\$

You would likely interface an analog sensor like that by building a microcontroller circuit to both sample the voltage and then communicate with the mobile device with some communication protocol -- either USB, MIDI, Bluetooth, etc. Some of these protocols would involve wiring to the mobile device port via the appropriate connector, and others would be wireless.

I wouldn't consider this a beginners project.

Here's an example of such devices, though they don't use your sensor: https://www.zubersoft.com/mobilesheets/pedals.html

\$\endgroup\$
8
  • \$\begingroup\$ thank you; I will check out that link. For the application, do you think this sensor would be appropriate? @Scott Seidman \$\endgroup\$ – user19964 Nov 19 '19 at 18:46
  • \$\begingroup\$ I have no idea what you're trying to do, @user19964, so it's impossible for me to say. I have used pressure sensors to provide data via a USB HID protocol, but not to a mobile platform. It seems like a very reasonable thing to do. \$\endgroup\$ – Scott Seidman Nov 19 '19 at 19:52
  • \$\begingroup\$ which type of pressure sensors have you used before? What I am basically trying to do is measure pressure that is exerted on the phone cover and depending on what the pressure is, the game on the phone will do something. I think using a force sensing resistor is the first option that would come to mind, but I have used these before and found them to be not that accurate and a bit fragile (at the sensor legs at least). @Scott Seidman \$\endgroup\$ – user19964 Nov 19 '19 at 19:56
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ I think the people that are pushing you toward a force sensitive resistor have a better idea. The sensor you spec is for gas. \$\endgroup\$ – Scott Seidman Nov 19 '19 at 20:04
  • \$\begingroup\$ seriously? Its for gas?🙈 well that is rather awkward!! Thank you for your input; I will keep that in mind moving forward @Scott Seidman \$\endgroup\$ – user19964 Nov 19 '19 at 20:28

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.