0
\$\begingroup\$

I am wondering what would happen when we discharge a capacitor, by using a SCR, through a coil and we leave a current applied to the gate of the SCR. The coil should generate a ‘reverse’ current right? Can this current go through the still open SCR or is this not possible because the SCR consists of diodes, which only let current in from one direction? (We have placed a flyback-diode in series with a resistor in parallel of the coil, if this would make a difference.)

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ For clarity, add a schematic. There's a schematic drawing tool available when you edit your question. \$\endgroup\$ – Bimpelrekkie Nov 20 '19 at 11:35
  • \$\begingroup\$ My bad, I’m currently writing this using my phone and I’ve got the schematics at home on my laptop. I will add them when I get home. \$\endgroup\$ – jortpepe Nov 20 '19 at 11:40
  • \$\begingroup\$ No, a coil doesn’t generate a reverse current. Walk before you run. \$\endgroup\$ – Andy aka Nov 20 '19 at 12:46
  • \$\begingroup\$ With reverse current I meant the inductive spike when the supply current is cut off by the SCR, sorry for being unclear. If we keep the SCR open then this will not occur, right? So thereby I do not need to worry about any current going through the SCR? \$\endgroup\$ – jortpepe Nov 20 '19 at 12:57
0
\$\begingroup\$

The coil will make the current continue after the capacitor has completely discharged, causing the capacitor to recharge with the opposite voltage polarity. When the capacitor voltage matches the inductor voltage, it will start to discharge back through the inductor, but the current will be blocked by the SCR. The inductor current will continue through the flyback diode and resistor until the energy in the inductor is dissipated.

|improve this answer|||||
\$\endgroup\$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.