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So the term 'shunt' is used to mean the following according to the Wikipedia page https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shunt_(electrical)

In electronics, a shunt is a device which creates a low-resistance path for electric current, to allow it to pass around another point in the circuit.

However the term 'shunt' seems to mean something else when describing a series-shunt amplifier or a shunt-series amplifier. So what does shunt mean in the context of amplifiers?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Can you give a link or some expanded context to where you found the term used? See if cc.ee.nchu.edu.tw/~aiclab/teaching/Electronics3/lect08.pdf helps. \$\endgroup\$ – Transistor Nov 21 '19 at 21:17
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    \$\begingroup\$ The wikipedia definition is wrong, in common use "shunt" means parallel, a component placed in parallel can be said to be placed in shunt, and we often call parallel resistors, capacitors, etc shunt resistors, shunt capacitors, and so on... However, there are "shunts" which do as the wiki definition says, typically in the context of power. \$\endgroup\$ – Sam Gallagher Nov 22 '19 at 0:25
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In the case of amplifiers with feedback, 'shunt' can mean to connect the input of the feedback network (e.g., a voltage divider) in parallel to the amp output... or the output of the feedback network to the amp input. I hope you know what 'in parallel' means?

If the input impedance of the feedback network is high enough, it will not 'shunt' (divert current from) the amp output. That is why, I prefer to name this connection 'parallel'.

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