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Curious as to if taping down a cord is a fire hazard. Some cords have very thick insulation and rubber so I do not see how it would be the case. I will try to find the article and update the post if ai find it.

For scenario Is it a fire hazard to tape down a cable that pulls 1500 watts and belongs to a space heater? What are your thoughts. 120V region

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  • \$\begingroup\$ It depends on the construction of the cord (wire diameter, insulation) as much as the load. (Also, load in amps would be more useful than load in watts, since we don't know if you're in a 120 V or 240 V region) \$\endgroup\$ – The Photon Dec 15 '19 at 3:21
  • \$\begingroup\$ 120V region is the one I am in \$\endgroup\$ – Luke Dec 15 '19 at 3:32
  • \$\begingroup\$ It's a fire hazard, but it's very likely against your area's electrical code as well. Forgetting the fact that this is more of a permanent installation than say, a temporary computer in a board room, a 1500W space heater is right at the 80% rule of sustained load carrying capaticy of a 120V, 15A circuit. There's probably a sticker on the heater that says not to use it with an extension cord, as that's a fire hazard in and of itself. Either way, the cable must be protected by physical means. \$\endgroup\$ – stevieb Dec 15 '19 at 17:55
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It's a fire hazard becuse it inhibits easy inspection of the cable but does not protect it from crushing forces or from impacts.

do not do this except in very temporary setups ( like 1 week or less)

Otherwise use a floor mount cable protector.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ What if you use clear tape? \$\endgroup\$ – DKNguyen Dec 15 '19 at 5:13
  • \$\begingroup\$ it still does not protect the cable from crushing \$\endgroup\$ – Jasen Dec 15 '19 at 5:28

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