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I'm studying for the exam of this very basic circuit analysis class that I'm taking, and there is this particular problem in the textbook:

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You are supposed to solve this without using the superposition technique. However, no matter what I have tried, I could never get the same result that they provided. If anyone could explain the steps to solving this I'd be very grateful.

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    \$\begingroup\$ First, you need to show us your attempt. \$\endgroup\$ – G36 Dec 16 '19 at 17:57
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    \$\begingroup\$ Hint: what is the voltage drop across an ideal ammeter? \$\endgroup\$ – Transistor Dec 16 '19 at 18:12
  • \$\begingroup\$ Use @Transistor's hint and solve for the current in each R. \$\endgroup\$ – Aaron Dec 16 '19 at 20:32
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    \$\begingroup\$ I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because this is homework without an attempt. \$\endgroup\$ – Marcus Müller Dec 16 '19 at 21:00
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Transistor There is no voltage drop, it basically acts as a wire in this case. \$\endgroup\$ – hkovesdi Dec 16 '19 at 21:40
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Okay, I think I have actually managed to solve it. I of R2ohm is 3amps I of R3ohm is 4amps I of R5ohm is 3.6amps Writing down a KVL on the top right node we get -7.6 amps of current flowing through the 12V source, then another KVL at the node left to the ammeter we actually get the -10.6 amps.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Good. You solved it yourself. You can mark this answer correct to show the problem is solved. (You may have to wait a day.) +1. \$\endgroup\$ – Transistor Dec 16 '19 at 22:12

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