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Does the plus in voltage source symbol represent the highest potential end or does it represent the positive end?

Is that answer true for IEEE and IEC and NEC?

It may seem trivial for those who know but I did my research and did not find the answer.

UPDATE:

My question arises due to the fact that there is electron flow (the real one when electrons are the charge carriers) and convention flow (the adapted one to avoid thinking "negatively" twice).

If the plus means the positive end, then electrons are moving into that end in electron flow, since electrons will go from the negative end to the positive one.

If the plus means the highest potential end, then electrons are moving out of that end in electron flow, since electrons will go from high potential to low potential.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Could you elaborate what the difference between "higher potential" and "positive end" of a voltage source would be? \$\endgroup\$ – Marcus Müller Dec 28 '19 at 20:28
  • \$\begingroup\$ @MarcusMüller Of course, I updated the question. Thanks a lot for your attention. \$\endgroup\$ – Alvaro Franz Dec 28 '19 at 20:33
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    \$\begingroup\$ no, the higher potential does not mean electrons are moving out of that. It means that end absorbs electrons. Also, this discussion has been lead here hundreds of times, but: Electron flow direction isn't any more "real" than conventional technical direction of current flow. It's just a convention. Both are equally "real". \$\endgroup\$ – Marcus Müller Dec 28 '19 at 20:35
  • \$\begingroup\$ @MarcusMüller If it has higher potential, why would electrons go to a higher potential, instead of a lower one? I am sorry if this is duplicate I really did not find the answer. Note that the question is not about electron or convention flow, but about the explicit meaning of the plus symbol. \$\endgroup\$ – Alvaro Franz Dec 28 '19 at 20:37
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    \$\begingroup\$ Does this answer your question: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Passive_sign_convention \$\endgroup\$ – Huisman Dec 28 '19 at 20:40
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It is both the positive end, and the end that is at higher potential.

Because the electron has negative charge, it has lower potential energy when it is at a higher potential, and vice versa. So electrons tend to flow towards higher potentials.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ This is incredibly clear. I am sorry for generating duplicate content. It was not my intention to be lazy. Thank you. \$\endgroup\$ – Alvaro Franz Dec 28 '19 at 20:44
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When a voltage source is said to be 5V, it means that the plus side will be 5V higher potential than the minus. If it was -5V, then the plus side will be 5V lower. Remember, voltage is always relative. The main convention is minus is always the reference.

It's good to stick to one perspective. Most things are based on conventional current, the flow of 'positive charge'. It is 'positive charge' that flows from higher to lower potential. A system based on electron current will invert everything.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Great answer Simon. Thank you a lot. \$\endgroup\$ – Alvaro Franz Dec 29 '19 at 10:16

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